EPA Air

EPA Region 7 Presents Two St. Louis Metro School Districts with Checks Totaling Nearly $16M for Clean School Bus Grants

Tue, 02/27/2024 - 19:00

LENEXA, KAN. (FEB. 27, 2024) – Today, EPA Region 7 Administrator Meg McCollister presented a $6,320,000 ceremonial check to the Ferguson-Florissant School District, and a $9,495,000 ceremonial check to the Ritenour School District as Clean School Bus Grant selectees.

These districts are two of Missouri’s selections for 2023 Clean School Bus Grants through President Biden’s Bipartisan Infrastructure Law, which is a once-in-a-generation investment that will further enable EPA to make unprecedented contributions to our country’s health and climate resiliency.

“Today’s celebration is not only about cleaner air for the St. Louis region, but cleaner air for our children,” McCollister said. “Thanks to the Bipartisan Infrastructure Law, students of the Ferguson-Florissant and Ritenour school districts will be able to ride to and from school on buses that produce zero emissions. This means reduced risks of asthma and other health risks associated with diesel exhaust.”

EPA Region 7 Administrator Meg McCollister (right) presents a $6,320,000 check to the Ferguson-Florissant School District, as a Clean School Bus Grant selectee, during a ceremony in Hazelwood, Missouri, on Feb. 27, 2024. McCollister is joined by Dr. Joseph Davis, Ferguson-Florissant School District superintendent (left), and Terry O’Neil, assistant superintendent of operations, maintenance and transportation. (Photo by U.S. EPA)

“Kids and families in our district rely on up-to-date and efficient buses to get to school every day. I’m excited to see the Ferguson-Florissant and Ritenour school districts receive federal grants for 40 electric school buses. Additional funding will also be disbursed to Highland and First Student school transportation service providers in our region,” said U.S. Representative Cori Bush (MO-1). “This is a double win. It ensures that schools in Missouri’s First District have dependable and safe transportation for our community and helps create a cleaner and healthier environment for all of us.”

Ferguson-Florissant School District

McCollister joined Ferguson-Florissant School District Superintendent Dr. Joseph Davis and Assistant Superintendent of Operations, Maintenance, and Transportation Terry O’Neil at the Hazelwood, Missouri, ceremony.

The district will use the funds to purchase 16 clean school buses.

“We are proud to lead the way, embracing the efficient and cost-saving benefits of battery-operated buses,” Davis said. “These new vehicles not only represent a significant step toward more eco-friendly transportation, but also demonstrate our dedication to providing a cleaner, more sustainable future for our students and the community. With this grant, we are able to drive change, both on the road and in the realm of education.”

EPA Region 7 Administrator Meg McCollister (far left) presents a $9,495,000 check to the Ritenour School District, as a Clean School Bus Grant selectee, during a ceremony in Overland, Missouri, on Feb. 27, 2024. Pictured left to right: McCollister; James McGee, mayor of Vinita Park, Missouri; Vanessa Henriquez-Pimblott, Ritenour Board of Education director; Dantes Johnson, Ritenour School District bus driver; Dr. Chris Kilbride, Ritenour School District superintendent; Ernest Longmeyer, Ritenour School District bus driver; Bryan Sanker, Ritenour School District director of transportation; Dwight Lindhorst, Ritenour School District chief financial officer; Rita Heard Days, St. Louis County Council (District 1) representative; Danielle Spradley, outreach director, U.S. Representative Cori Bush (MO-1); and Rev. Brian Jackson, mayor of Beverly Hills, Missouri. (Photo by U.S. EPA)Ritenour School District

McCollister joined Ritenour School District Superintendent Dr. Chris Kilbride and Director of Transportation Bryan Sanker at the Overland, Missouri, ceremony.

The district will use the funds to purchase 24 clean school buses.

“This truly is a game changer for our students, bus drivers, and our entire community,” Kilbride said. “Not only will our students and drivers have a more comfortable, quieter ride, but since there are zero emissions, our buses will be healthier for our entire community. This cost-effective fleet is one more way we are showing our students and families that we value their health and are good stewards of our environment.”

Background

EPA’s $5 billion Clean School Bus Program, created by President Biden’s Bipartisan Infrastructure Law, includes both a grant program where selected applicants are awarded funds to purchase buses, and a rebate program that allows selectees to receive awards before purchasing eligible buses that replace existing school buses with clean and zero-emission models. The funding presented today is part of the second round of selections announced for the newly created program. EPA will make more funds available for clean school buses in additional rounds of funding.

The Clean School Bus Program will reduce greenhouse gas emissions, save money for school districts, and produce cleaner air. Air pollution from older diesel engines is linked to asthma and other conditions that harm students’ health and cause them to miss school, particularly in communities of color and tribal communities. Efforts to minimize the effects of these older diesel engines will ensure cleaner air for students, bus drivers, and school staff working near the bus loading areas, and the communities through which the buses drive each day.

The reduction in greenhouse gas emissions from these bus replacements will also help to address the outsized role of the transportation sector in fueling the climate crisis. The program will benefit school districts as they upgrade to cost-saving, fuel-efficient school bus fleets by replacing existing buses with brand new zero-emission and clean school buses and freeing up needed resources for schools.

For more information, visit EPA’s Clean School Bus Program website.

View the full list of Clean School Bus Grantees.

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Biden-Harris Administration announces new cleanup projects in Pennsylvania as part of President Biden’s Investing in America agenda

Tue, 02/27/2024 - 19:00

PHILADELPHIA— Today, Feb. 27, 2024, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency announced a third and final wave of more than $1 billion for cleanup projects at more than 100 Superfund sites across the country as part of President Biden’s Investing in America agenda. This funding is made possible by the President’s Bipartisan Infrastructure Law and will launch new cleanup projects at 25 Superfund sites, including four in Pennsylvania.  

“After three rounds of investments, EPA is delivering on President Biden’s full promise to invest in cleaning up America’s most contaminated Superfund sites,” said EPA Deputy Administrator Janet McCabe. “This final round of Bipartisan Infrastructure Law funding has made it possible for EPA to initiate clean ups at every single Superfund site where construction work is ready to begin. This is an incredible milestone in our efforts to clean up and protect communities, deliver local jobs, enhance economic activity, and improve people’s lives for years to come.”  

“Today’s funding announcement continues EPA’s historic investment in the remediation of our nation’s most contaminated sites,” said EPA Mid-Atlantic Regional Administrator Adam Ortiz. “As a result, the legacy pollution at five Superfund sites in the mid-Atlantic will be cleaned up, providing public health protection to several communities in Delaware and Pennsylvania.” 

“When we clean up toxins and waste in Pennsylvania communities, we’re investing not only in their health and safety, but their economic security and potential,” said U.S. Senator Bob Casey (D-PA). “By cleaning up these Superfund sites, the infrastructure law is delivering cleaner air and water to Pennsylvania families and economic opportunity and revitalization throughout the Commonwealth.” 

“Accelerating these cleanups will improve the environment in Pennsylvania and restore economic vitality to the communities where these sites are located,” said Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection Interim Acting Secretary Jessica Shirley. “The infusion of resources from the Bipartisan Infrastructure Law will further eliminate the legacy pollution at these sites and make these communities whole, resulting in healthier communities and a better Pennsylvania.”  

Thousands of contaminated sites exist nationally due to hazardous waste being dumped, left out in the open, or otherwise improperly managed. These sites can include toxic chemicals from manufacturing facilities, processing plants, landfills and mining, and can harm the health and well-being of local communities in urban and rural areas. 

Thanks to the Bipartisan Infrastructure Law funding announced today, four cleanup projects in Pennsylvania will start. 

  • At the Jackson Ceramix, Inc. site in Jefferson County, funds will go towards the excavation and disposal of soil and sediment contaminated with lead. The contamination is from past industrial and manufacturing activities at the site. After the excavation, there will be a site-wide wetland restoration. 

  • At the Salford Quarry site in Montgomery County, EPA will be working to contain buried waste that has historically impacted groundwater using a perimeter wall below the surface and an impermeable cap.  

  • At the Valmont TCE site in Luzerne County, funds will be used for thermal remediation to remove contamination from below the ground surface using heat. The chemicals will be collected as vapors and then destroyed. 

  • At the Baghurst Drive site in Montgomery County, funding will be used to conduct remediation of contaminated groundwater. The cleanup technology will heat up the soil and bedrock to a temperature that will volatilize and capture contaminants. This will remove the source of contamination to groundwater and be the first step in restoring groundwater to drinking water conditions. 

In addition to the new cleanups announced, today’s investment supports continued construction at a number of Superfund sites across Pennsylvania.  

  • At the Crossley Farm Superfund site in Berks County, funds are enhancing groundwater treatment. The funding involves pumping contaminated groundwater to a treatment plant on the site, and improvements to the current plant. The water that will be treated is from a highly contaminated area known as the source area.   

  • At the North Penn Area 6 site in Montgomery County, initial BIL funding was used to complete excavation and disposal of contaminated soil, place new clean backfill, and restore the JW Rex property in just over 1 year.  The continued clean-up work at the JW Rex property will help to accelerate the total remediation efforts at the North Penn Area 6 site. 

Today’s investment is the final wave of funding from the $3.5 billion allocated for Superfund cleanup work in the President’s Bipartisan Infrastructure Law. So far, EPA has deployed more than $2 billion for cleanup activities at more than 150 Superfund National Priorities List sites.  Thanks to President Biden’s commitment to addressing legacy pollution and improving public health, EPA has been able to provide as much funding for cleanup work in the past two years as it did in the previous five years while delivering on President Biden’s Justice40 Initiative, which set a goal to deliver 40% of the overall benefits of certain federal investments to disadvantaged communities that are marginalized by underinvestment and overburdened by pollution. 

EPA is committed to continuing to carry out this work advancing environmental justice and incorporating equity considerations into all aspects of the Superfund cleanup process. More than one in four Black and Hispanic Americans live within three miles of a Superfund site. These investments are restoring the health and economic vitality of communities that have been exposed to pervasive legacy pollution. Thus far, nearly 80% of the funding from the Bipartisan Infrastructure Law has gone to sites in communities with potential environmental justice concerns. Out of the 25 sites to receive funding for new cleanup projects, more than 75% are in communities with potential environmental justice concerns based on data from EJSCREEN.  

The historic investment made by the Bipartisan Infrastructure Law strengthens every part of the Superfund program, making a dramatic difference in EPA’s ability to tackle threats to human health and the environment. In addition to funding cleanup construction work, the investment is enabling EPA to increase funding for and accelerate essential work needed to prepare sites for construction and to ensure communities are meaningfully involved in the cleanup process. In 2023, EPA continued to fund Superfund pre-construction activities such as remedial investigations, feasibility studies, remedial designs, and community involvement at double pre-Bipartisan Infrastructure Law levels. 

In 1980, Congress passed the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERLCA), known as Superfund. The law gave EPA the authority and funds to hold polluters accountable for cleaning up the most contaminated sites across the country. When no viable responsible party is found or cannot afford the cleanup, EPA steps in to address risks to human health and the environment using funds appropriated by Congress, like the funding provided by the Bipartisan Infrastructure Law. 

To see a list of the 25 sites to receive funding for new cleanup projects, visit EPA’s Superfund webpage

To see highlights from the first two years of Bipartisan Infrastructure Law funding at Superfund sites, visit EPA’s Cleaning Up Superfund Sites: Highlights of Bipartisan Infrastructure Law Funding website.  

EPA announces new cleanup projects in California as part of President Biden’s Investing in America agenda

Tue, 02/27/2024 - 19:00

San Francisco, CA Today, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency announced a third and final wave of more than $1 billion for cleanup projects nationwide at over 100 Superfund sites as part of President Biden’s Investing in America agenda. This funding is made possible by the President’s Bipartisan Infrastructure Law and will launch new cleanup projects at 25 Superfund sites nationwide, including California’s Sulphur Bank Mercury Mine in Clearlake Oaks, Lava Cap Mine in Nevada City, and Southern Avenue Industrial Area in South Gate.

“Thanks to unprecedented funding from President Biden’s Bipartisan Infrastructure Law, EPA is delivering significant investment to achieving the goal of long-term protection for communities living closest to contaminated sites,” said EPA Pacific Southwest Regional Administrator Martha Guzman. “With our Superfund cleanups, we are taking firm action to protect the health, safety, and environment of communities throughout California and the Pacific Southwest.”

“Californians shouldn’t have to worry about the safety of their drinking water, soil, or food supply, but residents near mining and manufacturing sites face significant health risks,” said U.S. Senator Alex Padilla. “Thanks to the Bipartisan Infrastructure Law, millions of dollars are coming to California to help clean up hazardous waste in these communities — and I will keep fighting to hold polluters responsible so that taxpayers aren’t footing the bill for cleanups.”

“The EPA’s announcement today is wonderful news for communities that have been impacted by Superfund sites,” said U.S Representative Nanette Barragán (CA-44). “In my district in Southern California, the contaminated Southern Avenue Industrial Area in South Gate has been on the Superfund Program’s National Priorities list for over a decade. Today’s funding announcement is the first step to cleaning up and improving this site. The Infrastructure and Jobs Act that I voted for and President Biden signed into law will continue to help clean up these toxic Superfund sites that contaminate soil and groundwater in frontline communities.”

Thanks to the Bipartisan Infrastructure Law funding announced today, three new cleanup projects in California will start.

Today’s announcement will fund mining waste cleanup at the Sulphur Bank Mercury Mine site in Clearlake Oaks, located on Elem Colony of Pomo Indians land. This cleanup will help protect nearby residential areas, safeguard residents’ long-term safety and health and make on-site mine areas safe for limited use by Elem Indian Colony residents for hunting, fishing, foraging, and transit to nearby lands. The site was mined intermittently for sulfur and mercury between 1865 and 1957 and now contains about 2.5 million cubic yards of mine waste, which stretches along 1,300 feet of shoreline in the Oaks Arm area of Clear Lake. Mine waste at the site has contaminated soils, surface water, and groundwater and has left mercury in sediments at the bottom of Clear Lake that have built up in fish.

At the Lava Cap Mine site in Nevada City, California, funding will be used to construct a wetland treatment plant to treat water discharging from the former mine area. The chemicals of concern at this site are arsenic, manganese, and iron. Arsenic is a known carcinogen. Iron and manganese are not considered risks to human health but can cause taste, odor, color, and staining problems when carried in water. The treatment plant will use processes, including metal precipitation, settling ponds, and lime addition, before downstream discharge. Lava Cap is a 33-acre former gold and silver mine just east of Grass Valley, California, operated from 1861 to 1943.

Finally, cleanup will begin at the Southern Avenue Industrial Area site in South Gate, where approximately 1,400 cubic yards of contaminated soil pollute the soil and groundwater. For decades, the now sectioned-off parking lot served as the site of an industrial facility for hot-melt carpet adhesive tape, contaminating the nearby soil with lead and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). These contaminants linger in the soil to this day. Cleanup will prevent future exposure, which can cause a variety of health effects including: eye, nose, and throat irritation; headaches and loss of coordination; nausea; and damage to the liver, kidneys, or central nervous system. Some contaminants are suspected or proven carcinogens. PCBs exposure can alter thyroid and reproductive function and increase the risk of developing cardiovascular and liver disease and diabetes.

In addition to the new cleanup projects, this investment supports the continued operation of a cleanup effort initially funded by prior Bipartisan Infrastructure Law –investment at the Argonaut Mine Superfund site in California.

At the Argonaut Mine site in Jackson, California, mining operations occurred from the 1850s to 1942. Portions of the site's soil still have high levels of arsenic, lead, mercury, and other metals and remain off-limits to the public. Since 2013, EPA has been working to understand and address the contamination at the site, removing the soil from a nearby lot and several residential yards in 2013 and removing soil in addition to capping a slope at Jackson Junior High School in 2015. Thanks to earlier funding from President Biden’s Bipartisan Infrastructure Law, EPA undertook a short-term cleanup known as a Removal Action at Argonaut from June 1, 2022, to November 2023. This removal action addressed the highest concentrations of contamination, which posed a risk to nearby community members if they accessed the site.  That prior cleanup cost approximately $25 million and moved 130,000 cubic yards of mine waste and contaminated soil/bedrock. The area of work covered 28 acres and consolidated all tailings and contaminated soil into a landfill on top of existing tailings and was capped with layers of clay, rodent barrier (gravel or stainless-steel wool), and composted soil that is 3.5 feet thick. Other areas not part of the landfill were also capped to prevent water percolation into the subsurface and as a barrier to remaining place waste.

Thousands of contaminated sites exist nationally due to hazardous waste being dumped, left out in the open, or otherwise improperly managed. These sites can include toxic chemicals from manufacturing facilities, processing plants, landfills, and mining and can harm the health and well-being of local communities in urban and rural areas.

Today’s investment is the final wave of funding from the $3.5 billion allocated for Superfund cleanup work in the President’s Bipartisan Infrastructure Law. So far, EPA has deployed over $2 billion for cleanup activities at over 150 Superfund National Priorities List sites. EPA has been able to provide as much funding for cleanup work in the past two years as it did in the previous five years while delivering on President Biden’s Justice40 Initiative, which set a goal to deliver 40% of the overall benefits of certain federal investments to disadvantaged communities that are marginalized by underinvestment and overburdened by pollution.

EPA is committed to continuing this work, advancing environmental justice, and incorporating equity considerations into all aspects of the Superfund cleanup process. More than one in four Black and Hispanic Americans live within three miles of a Superfund site. These investments are restoring the health and economic vitality of communities exposed to pervasive legacy pollution. Thus far, nearly 80% of the funding from the Bipartisan Infrastructure Law has gone to sites in communities with potential environmental justice concerns. Out of the 25 sites to receive funding for new cleanup projects, more than 75% are in communities with potential environmental justice concerns based on data from EJSCREEN.

To see a list of the 25 sites to receive funding for new cleanup projects, visit EPA’s Superfund webpage.

To see highlights from the first two years of Bipartisan Infrastructure Law funding at Superfund sites, visit EPA’s Cleaning Up Superfund Sites: Highlights of Bipartisan Infrastructure Law Funding website.

Learn more about EPA’s Pacific Southwest Region. Connect with us on Instagram, Facebook, and X.

Biden-Harris Administration announces additional funds for cleanup of Standard Chlorine Superfund Site in New Castle County, Delaware, as part of President Biden’s Investing in America Agenda

Tue, 02/27/2024 - 19:00

Philadelphia (Feb. 27, 2024) -- The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency announced today a third and final wave of more than $1 billion for cleanup projects at more than 100 Superfund sites across the country as part of President Biden’s Investing in America agenda. This funding is made possible by the President’s Bipartisan Infrastructure Law and will launch new cleanup projects at 25 Superfund sites including the Standard Chlorine of Delaware Inc. Superfund site in New Castle, Delaware.

“After three rounds of investments, EPA is delivering on President Biden’s full promise to invest in cleaning up America’s most contaminated Superfund sites,” said EPA Deputy Administrator Janet McCabe. “This final round of Bipartisan Infrastructure Law funding has made it possible for EPA to initiate clean ups at every single Superfund site where construction work is ready to begin. This is an incredible milestone in our efforts to clean up and protect communities, deliver local jobs, enhance economic activity, and improve people’s lives for years to come.”

“Today’s funding announcement continues EPA’s historic investment in the remediation of our nation’s most contaminated sites,” said EPA Mid-Atlantic Regional Administrator Adam Ortiz. “As a result, the legacy pollution at five Superfund sites in the mid-Atlantic will be cleaned up, providing public health protection to several communities in Delaware and Pennsylvania.”   

“Every Delawarean deserves clean air to breathe and access to clean land and water, no matter their zip code. That’s why as Chairman of the Environment and Public Works Committee, I worked tirelessly with my colleagues on and off the committee to craft the Bipartisan Infrastructure Law, which included billions of dollars for the Superfund program,” said Senator Tom Carper, Chairman of the U.S. Senate Environment and Public Works Committee. “I’m pleased to see EPA announce over $1 billion of that funding today for more than 100 of our nation’s most contaminated sites – helping communities across Delaware and the country clean up legacy pollution and protect public health all while supporting local economies.”

“Remediating and reclaiming valuable land will breathe fresh life into communities across our country and help address crucial public health and environmental justice issues,” said U.S. Senator Chris Coons, Co-Chair of the Senate Climate Solutions Caucus. “Here at home, these funds will speed up the years-long transformation of this Superfund site and improve the lives of Delawareans who live in the surrounding area. This is exactly the type of project that the bipartisan infrastructure law was crafted to benefit.”

“It’s critical that we continue to invest in cleaning up Superfund sites for the health and safety of communities across the country, and today’s announcement – made possible through the Bipartisan Infrastructure Law that I proudly championed in Congress – is helping us do just that right here in Delaware,” said Rep. Lisa Blunt Rochester. “Thanks to this new tranche of federal funding, the Environmental Protection Agency, along with the Delaware Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Control, will have more support at its disposal to advance its clean-up efforts of the Standard Chlorine Superfund site in New Castle, Delaware – helping us address legacy pollution and improve public health in our environmental justice communities.”

“This is another example of how funding from the Bipartisan Infrastructure Law – championed by President Biden and our congressional delegation – is addressing long-standing needs in our country,” Gov. John C. Carney said. “In this case, it is continuing the long-term cleanup of a former industrial site near Delaware City that we hope will return to productive use, making a safer and better community for the residents and businesses in the area. We are appreciative of another meaningful infrastructure investment in Delaware.”

“This $45 million investment from the Bipartisan Infrastructure Law funds issued by the Biden-Harris Administration is critical to the cleanup of this 65-acre Superfund site,” said DNREC Secretary Shawn M. Garvin. “These funds will advance efforts by EPA and DNREC to address the decades-long impact of chlorobenzene pollution on the adjacent wetlands. The efforts by DNREC to date, including the removal of hazardous chemicals, the installation of a groundwater containment system, and the construction of a cap to limit exposure, have laid a strong foundation for remediation. However, it's clear that there remains a substantial amount of work to ensure the site is returned to productive future use. With the ongoing support of the federal government, we will continue to work to ensure the legacy of this site is one of renewed opportunity for the people, wildlife and the ecosystems along Red Lion Creek and in Delaware.”

Thousands of contaminated sites exist nationally due to hazardous waste being dumped, left out in the open, or otherwise improperly managed. These sites can include toxic chemicals from manufacturing facilities, processing plants, landfills and mining, and can harm the health and well-being of local communities in urban and rural areas.

At the Standard Chlorine of Delaware Inc. Superfund site, funds will go toward excavation and treatment of wetland soils and sediment contaminated through historical industrial activities and spills outside of the former chemical manufacturing plant.

Today’s investment is the final wave of funding from the $3.5 billion allocated for Superfund cleanup work in the President’s Bipartisan Infrastructure Law. So far, EPA has deployed more than $2 billion for cleanup activities at more than 150 Superfund National Priorities List sites.  Thanks to President Biden’s commitment to addressing legacy pollution and improving public health, EPA has been able to provide as much funding for cleanup work in the past two years as it did in the previous five years while delivering on President Biden’s Justice40 Initiative, which set a goal to deliver 40% of the overall benefits of certain federal investments to disadvantaged communities that are marginalized by underinvestment and overburdened by pollution.

EPA is committed to continuing to carry out this work advancing environmental justice and incorporating equity considerations into all aspects of the Superfund cleanup process. More than one in four Black and Hispanic Americans live within three miles of a Superfund site. These investments are restoring the health and economic vitality of communities that have been exposed to pervasive legacy pollution. Thus far, nearly 80% of the funding from the Bipartisan Infrastructure Law has gone to sites in communities with potential environmental justice concerns. Out of the 25 sites to receive funding for new cleanup projects, more than 75% are in communities with potential environmental justice concerns based on data from EJSCREEN.

The historic investment made by the Bipartisan Infrastructure Law strengthens every part of the Superfund program, making a dramatic difference in EPA’s ability to tackle threats to human health and the environment. In addition to funding cleanup construction work, the investment is enabling EPA to increase funding for and accelerate essential work needed to prepare sites for construction and to ensure communities are meaningfully involved in the cleanup process. In 2023, EPA continued to fund Superfund pre-construction activities such as remedial investigations, feasibility studies, remedial designs, and community involvement at double pre-Bipartisan Infrastructure Law levels.

In 1980, Congress passed the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERLCA), known as Superfund. The law gave EPA the authority and funds to hold polluters accountable for cleaning up the most contaminated sites across the country. When no viable responsible party is found or cannot afford the cleanup, EPA steps in to address risks to human health and the environment using funds appropriated by Congress, like the funding provided by the Bipartisan Infrastructure Law.

To see a list of the 25 sites to receive funding for new cleanup projects, visit EPA’s Superfund webpage.

To see highlights from the first two years of Bipartisan Infrastructure Law funding at Superfund sites, visit EPA’s Cleaning Up Superfund Sites: Highlights of Bipartisan Infrastructure Law Funding website.

For more information about EPA’s Superfund program, visit EPA’s Superfund website:  https://www.epa.gov/superfund.

EPA Announces Bipartisan Infrastructure Law Funds for Cleanups at Three Superfund Sites in New Jersey

Tue, 02/27/2024 - 19:00

NEW YORK  - Today, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) announced that three New Jersey Superfund sites are among the over 100 sites across the country getting more than $1 billion for cleanup projects as part of President Biden’s Investing in America agenda. This funding is made possible by the President’s Bipartisan Infrastructure Law and will launch new cleanup projects at 25 Superfund sites and continue other cleanups at over 85 Superfund sites. The New Jersey Superfund sites included are the Matlack, Inc. site in Woolwich, the Raritan Bay Slag site in Old Bridge Township, and the Roebling Steel site in Florence Township. 

Thousands of contaminated sites exist nationally due to hazardous waste being dumped, left out in the open, or otherwise improperly managed. These sites can include toxic chemicals from manufacturing facilities, processing plants, landfills and mining, and can harm the health and well-being of local communities in urban and rural areas. More than one in four Black and Hispanic Americans live within three miles of a Superfund site.  

"People living in New Jersey, which has the most Superfund sites in the nation, have seen firsthand how transformative the Superfund program can be for communities,” said Regional Administrator Lisa F. Garcia.  “This investment in America and in New Jersey builds on the historic progress we have already made in recent years to ensure that communities living near the most serious uncontrolled, or abandoned contaminated sites get the protections they deserve.”  

“Superfund sites pose serious threats to human health, increasing the risks of cancer, birth defects, and other serious illnesses that fall disproportionately on low-income communities and communities of color,” said Senator Cory Booker. “These cleanup projects will revitalize three Superfund sites in critical need in our state, which has the most Superfund sites in the nation. I’ve championed the cleanup of contaminated sites since I was Mayor of Newark, and I’m proud to work with the Biden-Harris Administration to address contamination and protect our state’s public and environmental health. The Bipartisan Infrastructure Law is delivering real results by investing in cleaner air, water, and soil for our communities.”

“Superfund sites threaten public and environmental health across the country, but with today’s announcement, the Bipartisan Infrastructure Law is continuing to deliver on the promise we made to clean up backlogged sites and give our communities the peace of mind they deserve,” said Representative Frank Pallone, Jr., Ranking Member of the House Energy and Commerce Committee. “For dozens of communities, today’s funding is a welcome assurance that help is on the way. I appreciate the Biden Administration’s commitment to transforming communities that have been impacted by toxic contamination and applaud EPA for moving swiftly to put the Bipartisan Infrastructure Law’s resources to work.”

“I voted to pass the Bipartisan Infrastructure Law so we could fix the persistent shortcomings in our nation’s infrastructure, including cleanup of hazardous Superfund sites. It is terrific news that this site in Florence Township will now have an influx of critical, federal funding to help complete what has been a decades-long cleanup process. I am proud to see our infrastructure investments continue to come to New Jersey and propel projects like this that desperately need attention. For the health and safety of our communities and environment, we need to continue essential work like this to protect the waterways and ecosystems in and around the Delaware River and across the nation,” said Representative Andy Kim.

“My DEP colleagues and I express our gratitude to the Biden-Harris Administration and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency for making these funds available to advance cleanup progress at Superfund sites in Woolwich, Old Bridge and Florence,” said New Jersey Environmental Protection Commissioner Shawn M. LaTourette. “The President’s Investing In America initiative is really, at its heart, an investment in our communities. With the addition of this round of funding, the Bipartisan Infrastructure Law has enabled the DEP over the years to leverage more than $80 million in funding on remediation work in other communities across New Jersey, many of which are historically disadvantaged or overburdened. This partnership exemplifies the continued reach of the Bipartisan Infrastructure Law in bringing positive outcomes to thousands of communities across the nation.”

The Matlack, Inc. site is a 79-acre property along Route 322 in Woolwich, New Jersey. From 1962 to 2001, the site was used for cleaning trucks and tankers that transported various hazardous substances, including flammable and corrosive liquids. The contaminated cleaning solution was put in an unlined lagoon behind the terminal building until 1976. In addition to the lagoon, EPA found contamination was coming from the Drum Disposal Area of the site. Primary contaminants of concern are volatile organic compounds (VOCs), including Trichloroethylene (TCE) and Tetrachloroethylene (PCE) and various chlorinated volatile organic compounds (CVOCs).   

The EPA BIL funding will be used to clean up the Drum Disposal Area of the Matlack site using a thermal treatment technique that will extract contaminant vapors from soil and groundwater. As part of the cleanup, samples will be taken of the soil and groundwater to confirm the treatment worked. This work is estimated to be worth about $30 million. 

The Raritan Bay Slag site is in the Townships of Old Bridge and Sayreville in New Jersey and includes about 1.5 miles of the waterfront of Raritan Bay. In the late 1960s and early 1970s, lead-containing waste slag was deposited along the seawall and jetty sectors of the site. In 2007, elevated concentrations of lead and other metals were identified in soil, water, and sediment. The site is organized into three sectors, which are the Seawall Sector, the Jetty Sector and the Margaret’s Creek Sector. EPA completed a full cleanup of the Margaret’s Creek Sector in September 2018, including restoration of impacted wetland areas. 

The EPA BIL funding will be used to do initial, preparatory and contracting work associated with the Seawall Sector of the Raritan Bay Slag site. The estimated value of this work is $1 million. The future work that the BIL-funded preparation work supports, will include excavation of all source materials and contaminated soil and sediment, sampling and restoration of the areas. 

The 200-acre Roebling Steel Company site, which is next to the Delaware River in Florence Township, New Jersey, was used to manufacture steel products. The site included two inactive sludge lagoons and an abandoned landfill. The soil was contaminated with heavy metals like lead, chromium, and cadmium. The nearby river, creek and wetland sediment were also contaminated with lead, chromium, copper, and hazardous oils and tars. EPA has been cleaning up the site in stages since 1991. EPA has worked to address contaminated structures, soils, sediments, groundwater, and slag contaminated areas across the site. 

In 2022, EPA used BIL funding to monitor groundwater, cap a portion of the site, and decontaminate, demolish, and conduct historic mitigation of remaining buildings on site. The funds announced today will be applied to cap the remaining 100 acres of the site, including a slag area. The cap will include stormwater drainage and an access road for maintenance. EPA will apply approximately $2 million to initiate the new phase of work.  

Today’s investment is the final wave of funding from the $3.5 billion allocated for Superfund cleanup work in the President’s Bipartisan Infrastructure Law. So far, EPA has deployed more than $2 billion for cleanup activities at more than 150 Superfund National Priorities List sites. Thanks President Biden’s commitment to addressing legacy pollution and improving public health, EPA has been able to provide as much funding for cleanup work in the past two years as it did in the previous five years while delivering on President Biden’s Justice40 Initiative, which set a goal to deliver 40% of the overall benefits of certain federal investments to disadvantaged communities that are marginalized by underinvestment and overburdened by pollution. 

EPA is committed to advancing environmental justice and incorporating equity considerations into all aspects of the Superfund cleanup process.  Thus far, nearly 80% of the funding from the Bipartisan Infrastructure Law has gone to sites in communities with potential environmental justice concerns. Out of the 25 sites to receive funding for new cleanup projects, more than 75% are in communities with potential environmental justice concerns based on data from EJSCREEN

President Biden’s Investing in America agenda is restoring the health and economic vitality of communities that have been exposed to pervasive legacy pollution. The historic investment made by the Bipartisan Infrastructure Law strengthens every part of the Superfund program, making a dramatic difference in EPA’s ability to tackle threats to human health and the environment. In addition to funding cleanup construction work, the investment is enabling EPA to increase funding for and accelerate essential work needed to prepare sites for construction and to ensure communities are meaningfully involved in the cleanup process. In 2023, EPA continued to fund Superfund pre-construction activities such as remedial investigations, feasibility studies, remedial designs, and community involvement at double pre-Bipartisan Infrastructure Law levels. 

In 1980, Congress passed the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERLCA), known as Superfund. The law gave EPA the authority and funds to hold polluters accountable for cleaning up the most contaminated sites across the country. When no viable responsible party is found or cannot afford the cleanup, EPA steps in to address risks to human health and the environment using funds appropriated by Congress, like the funding provided by the Bipartisan Infrastructure Law. 

To see a list of the 25 sites to receive funding for new cleanup projects, visit EPA’s Superfund webpage.

To see highlights from the first two years of Bipartisan Infrastructure Law funding at Superfund sites, visit EPA’s Cleaning Up Superfund Sites: Highlights of Bipartisan Infrastructure Law Funding website.

For more information about EPA’s Superfund program, visit EPA’s Superfund website

Follow EPA Region 2 on X and visit our Facebook page. For more information about EPA Region 2, visit our website.  

24-16

EPA Announces Bipartisan Infrastructure Law Funds for Cleanups at Two Superfund Sites in New York

Tue, 02/27/2024 - 19:00

NEW YORK  - Today, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) announced that two New York Superfund sites are among the over 100 sites across the country getting more than $1 billion for cleanup projects as part of President Biden’s Investing in America agenda. This funding is made possible by the President’s Bipartisan Infrastructure Law and will launch new cleanup projects at 25 Superfund sites and continue other cleanups at over 85 Superfund sites. The New York Superfund sites included are the Old Roosevelt Field Contaminated Groundwater Area Site in Garden City and a portion of the Onondaga Lake Superfund site near Syracuse. 

Thousands of contaminated sites exist nationally due to hazardous waste being dumped, left out in the open, or otherwise improperly managed. These sites can include toxic chemicals from manufacturing facilities, processing plants, landfills and mining, and can harm the health and well-being of local communities in urban and rural areas. More than one in four Black and Hispanic Americans live within three miles of a Superfund site.  

“People living in New York have seen firsthand how transformative the Superfund program can be for communities,” said Regional Administrator Lisa F. Garcia.  “This investment in America and in New York builds on the historic progress we have already made in recent years to ensure that communities living near the most serious uncontrolled, or abandoned contaminated sites get the protections they deserve.” 

“Syracuse and the communities surrounding Onondaga Lake have seen firsthand how transformative the Superfund program can be. Onondaga Lake was once one of the most polluted lakes in the country, but because of decades of work by activists and the strengthened federal environmental laws, the waterways are the cleanest they have been in nearly a century, but there is still much more to be done. Today, thanks to our Bipartisan Infrastructure Law, approximately $23 million in federal funding will flow to jumpstart the cleanup of the Ley Creek portion of the Onondaga Lake Superfund site – while the EPA continues work to hold polluters accountable,” said Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer. “Our work is far from finished, but kick starting the cleanup of these long-polluted sites and waterways exactly what the Superfund funding I fought to supercharge in the Bipartisan Infrastructure Law was mean to do. I am proud to deliver this federal funding so that cleanup for Central NY can finally get underway and vow to continue to fight for the resources needed to protect our beautiful Central New York waterways.”

“This is a critical investment that will help clean up dangerous and widespread contaminants in New York’s groundwater and waterways,” said Senator Kirsten Gillibrand. “I’m proud that the Bipartisan Infrastructure Law is providing this funding, which will help clean up contamination at Roosevelt Field and Onondaga Lake. I will continue working with the Biden administration to address legacy pollution and to improve public health for all.”

New York State Department of Environmental Conservation Commissioner Basil Seggos said, “Thanks to our strong partnership with U.S. EPA Administrator Michael Regan and EPA Regional Administrator 2 Lisa Garcia, New York State continues to benefit from investments under the Biden Administration’s Bipartisan Infrastructure Law to cleanup former industrial sites in communities across the state. The significant funding announced today bolsters New York’s extensive and ongoing cleanup efforts in communities historically overburdened by environmental pollution, advancing a path to a cleaner environment and protection of the heath of New Yorkers for generations to come.”

The Old Roosevelt Field Contaminated Groundwater Area Site is located on the former location of the Roosevelt Field airfield in Garden City, Nassau County, New York. Roosevelt Field was used for aviation from 1911 to 1951. It is likely that chlorinated solvents were used at Roosevelt Field during and after World War II. Trichloroethylene (TCE) and Tetrachloroethylene (PCE) were detected in the Village of Garden City in several public water supply wells in the late 1970s and early 1980s.  All residences and commercial buildings within the site are now connected to public water supplies that are treated to meet drinking water standards.  

EPA BIL funding will be used to address groundwater contamination at the Old Roosevelt Field Contaminated Groundwater site by pumping the water to the surface, treating it and discharging to a basin. This work is estimated to cost about $13 million. 

The 4.6-square mile Onondaga Lake site is located northwest of Syracuse in New York. Its shoreline borders Syracuse, as well as the towns of Geddes and Salina and villages of Solvay and Liverpool. The site includes the lake and seven tributaries, as well as several land-based sources of contamination. Industries around Onondaga Lake have discharged pollutants and sewage into the lake for more than 100 years. To facilitate coordination of the various investigations and cleanup activities being conducted by EPA and the New York Department of Environmental Conservation in and on the shorelines of the lake and several of its tributaries, 11 subsites have been created for the site. The Ley Creek Deferred Media portion of the General Motors–Inland Fisher Guide subsite includes Ley Creek and its floodplains from the former General Motors facility to the Route 11 bridge.   

The EPA BIL funding will be used to address soil on the floodplains and sediment in Ley Creek that are contaminated with polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and metals. The work will include excavating, disposing of and backfilling about 144,000 cubic yards of contaminated soil from the floodplains and excavating and disposing of about 9,600 cubic yards of contaminated sediment from the bottom of Ley Creek. The BIL funding will pay for approximately $23 million worth of cleanup work to get the action started as EPA continues to engage with responsible parties. 

Today’s investment is the final wave of funding from the $3.5 billion allocated for Superfund cleanup work in the President’s Bipartisan Infrastructure Law. So far, EPA has deployed more than $2 billion for cleanup activities at more than 150 Superfund National Priorities List sites. Thanks President Biden’s commitment to addressing legacy pollution and improving public health, EPA has been able to provide as much funding for cleanup work in the past two years as it did in the previous five years while delivering on President Biden’s Justice40 Initiative, which set a goal to deliver 40% of the overall benefits of certain federal investments to disadvantaged communities that are marginalized by underinvestment and overburdened by pollution. 

EPA is committed to advancing environmental justice and incorporating equity considerations into all aspects of the Superfund cleanup process.  Thus far, nearly 80% of the funding from the Bipartisan Infrastructure Law has gone to sites in communities with potential environmental justice concerns. Out of the 25 sites to receive funding for new cleanup projects, more than 75% are in communities with potential environmental justice concerns based on data from EJSCREEN

President Biden’s Investing in America agenda is restoring the health and economic vitality of communities that have been exposed to pervasive legacy pollution. The historic investment made by the Bipartisan Infrastructure Law strengthens every part of the Superfund program, making a dramatic difference in EPA’s ability to tackle threats to human health and the environment. In addition to funding cleanup construction work, the investment is enabling EPA to increase funding for and accelerate essential work needed to prepare sites for construction and to ensure communities are meaningfully involved in the cleanup process. In 2023, EPA continued to fund Superfund pre-construction activities such as remedial investigations, feasibility studies, remedial designs, and community involvement at double pre-Bipartisan Infrastructure Law levels. 

In 1980, Congress passed the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERLCA), known as Superfund. The law gave EPA the authority and funds to hold polluters accountable for cleaning up the most contaminated sites across the country. When no viable responsible party is found or cannot afford the cleanup, EPA steps in to address risks to human health and the environment using funds appropriated by Congress, like the funding provided by the Bipartisan Infrastructure Law. 

To see a list of the 25 sites to receive funding for new cleanup projects, visit EPA’s Superfund webpage.

To see highlights from the first two years of Bipartisan Infrastructure Law funding at Superfund sites, visit EPA’s Cleaning Up Superfund Sites: Highlights of Bipartisan Infrastructure Law Funding website.

For more information about EPA’s Superfund program, visit EPA’s Superfund website

Follow EPA Region 2 on X and visit our Facebook page. For more information about EPA Region 2, visit our website.  

24-15

 

$40 million in Bipartisan Infrastructure Law funding announced for East Helena yard cleanups

Tue, 02/27/2024 - 19:00

EAST HELENA, Mont. --Today, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) announced a third and final wave of more than $1 billion new Bipartisan Infrastructure Law (BIL) funding for cleanup projects at more than 100 Superfund sites across the country. As part of today’s announcement, the East Helena Superfund site will receive $40 million for the cleanup of residential yards contaminated by lead from the ASARCO smelter formerly located adjacent to the city.  

The funding comes after the recent finalization of an Explanation of Significant Differences (ESD) document for the Site which amended the 2009 Record of Decision (ROD) to reduce soil-lead cleanup levels in East Helena from 500 ppm to 400 ppm. The previous cleanup trigger, 1,000 ppm, was also removed in the ESD. With this BIL funding, alongside an additional $10 million in existing settlement funds, cleanups in East Helena targeting residential yards with greater than 400 ppm soil-lead contamination will begin this summer.  

“After three rounds of investments, EPA is delivering on President Biden’s full promise to invest in cleaning up America’s most contaminated Superfund sites,” said EPA Deputy Administrator Janet McCabe. “This final round of Bipartisan Infrastructure Law funding has made it possible for EPA to initiate clean ups at every single Superfund site where construction work is ready to begin. This is an incredible milestone in our efforts to clean up and protect communities, deliver local jobs, enhance economic activity, and improve people’s lives for years to come.”  

“Funding from the Bipartisan Infrastructure Law has been a game-changer for so many communities across the United States,” said EPA Region 8 Administrator KC Becker. “Protecting kids and families from lead exposure where they live, work and play is a top EPA priority. With this funding, EPA’s Site team can quickly mobilize to remove lead from affected yards in East Helena.” 

“Contamination, especially lead contamination, can have a devastating impact on communities – and I know for a fact that folks in East Helena are concerned about all the possible contaminants leftover from the old smelter,” said Senator Jon Tester. “I’m proud to have secured this funding from my bipartisan infrastructure law, and I’ll continue to work to ensure this site is cleaned up safely and effectively.”

“The city is excited that the EPA is continuing to show concern for the residents of East Helena,” said East Helena Mayor Kelly Harris. “East Helena is a great place to live and to raise a family—we value our people and our community, and it is great to see more funding and more cleanups on the way.” 

"Montana DEQ is excited by EPA’s announcement that funding has been secured for additional residential yard cleanups in East Helena,” said DEQ Waste Management and Remediation Division Administrator Amy Steinmetz. “This vital work will have a lasting positive impact on the community."

Previous cleanup efforts under the 2009 ROD led to the remediation of hundreds of yards in East Helena, which involved the removal and replacement of residential soils contaminated by more than one hundred years of smelting lead, zinc and other metals by the former ASARCO plant.  

Funds directed at East Helena through this BIL disbursement will support new residential yard cleanups for properties with soil-lead content between 400 ppm and 1,000 ppm which, under previous plans, did not qualify for cleanup. EPA will host an information session at East Helena City Hall from 9-10 a.m. on Monday, March 11 to discuss cleanup plans and timelines. Those unable to attend the morning session are welcome to drop in any time on Monday for open office hours to discuss cleanup plans and ask questions.  

Today’s investment, part of President Biden’s Investing in America agenda, delivers $1 billion in funds to more than 100 Superfund sites across the country to both launch new cleanups and continue existing cleanup efforts. Previous waves of funding totaled more than $2 billion for cleanup activities at more than 150 Superfund National Priority List (NPL) in the United States. Today’s investment is the final wave of funding from the $3.5 billion allocated for Superfund cleanup work in the President’s Bipartisan Infrastructure Law.  

EPA is committed to continuing to carry out this work advancing environmental justice and incorporating equity considerations into all aspects of the Superfund cleanup process. Thus far, nearly 80% of the funding from the Bipartisan Infrastructure Law has gone to sites in communities with potential environmental justice concerns. Out of the 25 sites to receive funding for new cleanup projects, more than 75% are in communities with potential environmental justice concerns based on data from EJSCREEN

More information on today’s announcement and sites receiving funding. 

Highlights from Bipartisan Infrastructure Law funding at Superfund sites. 

More information on the East Helena Superfund site. 

Biden-Harris Administration announces over $1 billion to start new cleanup projects and continue work at 100 Superfund sites across the country

Tue, 02/27/2024 - 19:00

WASHINGTON  — Today, Feb. 27, 2024, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency announced a third and final wave of more than $1 billion for cleanup projects at more than 100 Superfund sites across the country as part of President Biden’s Investing in America agenda. This funding is made possible by the President’s Bipartisan Infrastructure Law and will launch new cleanup projects at 25 Superfund sites and continue other cleanups at over 85 Superfund sites.

Thousands of contaminated sites exist nationally due to hazardous waste being dumped, left out in the open, or otherwise improperly managed. These sites can include toxic chemicals from manufacturing facilities, processing plants, landfills and mining, and can harm the health and well-being of local communities in urban and rural areas. More than one in four Black and Hispanic Americans live within three miles of a Superfund site.

Today’s investment is the final wave of funding from the $3.5 billion allocated for Superfund cleanup work in the President’s Bipartisan Infrastructure Law. So far, EPA has deployed more than $2 billion for cleanup activities at more than 150 Superfund National Priorities List sites. Thanks to President Biden’s commitment to addressing legacy pollution and improving public health, EPA has been able to provide as much funding for cleanup work in the past two years as it did in the previous five years while delivering on President Biden’s Justice40 Initiative, which set a goal to deliver 40% of the overall benefits of certain federal investments to disadvantaged communities that are marginalized by underinvestment and overburdened by pollution.

“After three rounds of investments, EPA is delivering on President Biden’s full promise to invest in cleaning up America’s most contaminated Superfund sites,” said EPA Deputy Administrator Janet McCabe. “This final round of Bipartisan Infrastructure Law funding has made it possible for EPA to initiate clean ups at every single Superfund site where construction work is ready to begin. This is an incredible milestone in our efforts to clean up and protect communities, deliver local jobs, enhance economic activity, and improve people’s lives for years to come.”

“Every American deserves clean air to breathe and access to clean land and water, no matter their zip code. That’s why as Chairman of the Environment and Public Works Committee, I worked tirelessly with my colleagues on and off the committee to craft the Bipartisan Infrastructure Law, which included billions of dollars for the Superfund program,” said Senator Tom Carper, Chairman of the U.S. Senate Environment and Public Works Committee. “I’m pleased to see EPA announce over $1 billion of that funding today for more than 100 of our nation’s most contaminated sites – helping communities across the country clean up legacy pollution and protect public health all while supporting local economies.”

“Superfund sites threaten public and environmental health across the country, but with today’s announcement, the Bipartisan Infrastructure Law is continuing to deliver on the promise we made to clean up backlogged sites and give our communities the peace of mind they deserve,” said Rep. Frank Pallone, Jr., Ranking Member of the House Energy and Commerce Committee. “For dozens of communities, today’s funding is a welcome assurance that help is on the way. I appreciate the Biden Administration’s commitment to transforming communities that have been impacted by toxic contamination and applaud EPA for moving swiftly to put the Bipartisan Infrastructure Law’s resources to work.”

Thanks to the Bipartisan Infrastructure Law funding announced today, a number of new cleanup projects will move forward, including:

  • At the East Helena Superfund site in East Helena, Montana, funds will advance critical cleanup of soil and groundwater contamination caused by more than a century of smelting lead, zinc, and other metals at the former ASARCO facility.
  • At the US Finishing/Cone Mills Superfund site in Greenville, South Carolina, funds will support the completion of cleanup work at the site by treating contaminated groundwater, paving the way for the site’s return to productive use as mixed-use development (commercial and residential) through a unique public-private partnership with the state of South Carolina and landowners. 
  • At the Standard Chlorine of Delaware Inc. Superfund site in New Castle, Delaware, funds will go toward excavation and treatment of wetland soils and sediment contaminated through historical industrial activities and spills outside of the former chemical manufacturing plant.
  • At the Sulphur Bank Mercury Mine Superfund site in Lake County, California, funds will address mining waste to help ensure the long term protection of residential areas and make on-site mine areas safe for limited use by Elem Indian Colony residents for hunting, fishing, foraging, and transit to nearby lands.
  • At the Iron King Mine/Humboldt Smelter Superfund site in Dewey-Humbolt, Arizona, funding will protect the community from mining and smelting waste by cleaning up additional residential properties and permanently consolidating the contaminated waste.

EPA is committed to advancing environmental justice and incorporating equity considerations into all aspects of the Superfund cleanup process. Thus far, nearly 80% of the funding from the Bipartisan Infrastructure Law has gone to sites in communities with potential environmental justice concerns. Out of the 25 sites to receive funding for new cleanup projects, more than 75% are in communities with potential environmental justice concerns based on data from EJSCREEN.

President Biden’s Investing in America agenda is restoring the health and economic vitality of communities that have been exposed to pervasive legacy pollution. The historic investment made by the Bipartisan Infrastructure Law strengthens every part of the Superfund program, making a dramatic difference in EPA’s ability to tackle threats to human health and the environment. In addition to funding cleanup construction work, the investment is enabling EPA to increase funding for and accelerate essential work needed to prepare sites for construction and to ensure communities are meaningfully involved in the cleanup process. In 2023, EPA continued to fund Superfund pre-construction activities such as remedial investigations, feasibility studies, remedial designs, and community involvement at double pre-Bipartisan Infrastructure Law levels.

In 1980, Congress passed the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERLCA), known as Superfund. The law gave EPA the authority and funds to hold polluters accountable for cleaning up the most contaminated sites across the country. When no viable responsible party is found or cannot afford the cleanup, EPA steps in to address risks to human health and the environment using funds appropriated by Congress, like the funding provided by the Bipartisan Infrastructure Law.

To see a list of the 25 sites to receive funding for new cleanup projects, visit EPA’s Superfund webpage.

To see highlights from the first two years of Bipartisan Infrastructure Law funding at Superfund sites, visit EPA’s Cleaning Up Superfund Sites: Highlights of Bipartisan Infrastructure Law Funding website.

For more information about EPA’s Superfund program, visit EPA’s Superfund website.

EPA announces new cleanup projects in Arizona as part of President Biden’s Investing in America agenda

Tue, 02/27/2024 - 19:00

San Francisco, CA Today, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency announced a third and final wave of more than $1 billion for cleanup projects at over 100 Superfund sites nationwide as part of President Biden’s Investing in America agenda. This funding is made possible by the President’s Bipartisan Infrastructure Law and will launch new cleanup projects at 25 Superfund sites nationwide, including Arizona’s Iron King Mine – Humboldt Smelter Superfund Site in Dewey-Humbolt.

“Thanks to unprecedented funding from President Biden’s Bipartisan Infrastructure Law, EPA is delivering significant investment to achieving the goal of long-term protection for communities living closest to contaminated sites,” said EPA Pacific Southwest Regional Administrator Martha Guzman. “With our Superfund cleanups we are taking firm action to protect the health, safety, and environment of communities throughout Arizona and the Pacific Southwest.”

“Our Bipartisan Infrastructure Law continues to address critical needs in Arizona, including by making investments to protect public health and the environment,” said U.S. Senator Mark Kelly. “When we were negotiating the infrastructure law, one of my priorities was addressing the cleanup of abandoned mine sites in my state. This is going to protect Yavapai County residents from waste and contamination.”

“The historic investment I secured from my bipartisan infrastructure law will clean up the hazardous waste impacting the Dewey-Humboldt community – ensuring our state remains a safe, healthy place to call home for generations to come,” said U.S. Senator Kyrsten Sinema.

The Bipartisan Infrastructure Law funding will enable the EPA to fund further cleanup at the Iron King Mine – Humboldt Smelter Superfund Site in Dewey-Humbolt, Arizona. This funding is crucial to safeguard the community from mining and smelting waste by supporting the cleanup of additional residential properties and permanently consolidating the contaminated waste on-site. The Iron King Mine operated from the early 1900s to 1970, leaving behind four million cubic yards of mine tailings and approximately one million cubic yards of waste rock and contaminated soils. Some of the tailings at the site are still exposed and susceptible to erosion. The smelter operated from the late 1800s to about 1937, leaving behind over 750,000 cubic yards of mine tailings, waste dross, slag, and contaminated soils. The site's mine tailings contain high levels of arsenic and lead, with arsenic being a known carcinogen and lead exposure causing damage to the brain and nervous system, slowed growth and development in children, learning and behavior problems, and hearing and speech problems.

Thousands of contaminated sites exist nationally due to hazardous waste being dumped, left out in the open, or otherwise improperly managed. These sites can include toxic chemicals from manufacturing facilities, processing plants, landfills, and mining and can harm the health and well-being of local communities in urban and rural areas.

Today’s investment is the final wave of funding from the $3.5 billion allocated for Superfund cleanup work in the President’s Bipartisan Infrastructure Law. So far, EPA has deployed over $2 billion for cleanup activities at over 150 Superfund National Priorities List sites. EPA has been able to provide as much funding for cleanup work in the past two years as it did in the previous five years while delivering on President Biden’s Justice40 Initiative, which set a goal to deliver 40% of the overall benefits of certain federal investments to disadvantaged communities that are marginalized by underinvestment and overburdened by pollution.

EPA is committed to continuing this work, advancing environmental justice, and incorporating equity considerations into all aspects of the Superfund cleanup process. More than one in four Black and Hispanic Americans live within three miles of a Superfund site. These investments are restoring the health and economic vitality of communities exposed to pervasive legacy pollution. Thus far, nearly 80% of the funding from the Bipartisan Infrastructure Law has gone to sites in communities with potential environmental justice concerns. Out of the 25 sites to receive funding for new cleanup projects, more than 75% are in communities with potential environmental justice concerns based on data from EJSCREEN.

To see a list of the 25 sites to receive funding for new cleanup projects, visit EPA’s Superfund webpage.

To see highlights from the first two years of Bipartisan Infrastructure Law funding at Superfund sites, visit EPA’s Cleaning Up Superfund Sites: Highlights of Bipartisan Infrastructure Law Funding website.

Learn more about EPA’s Pacific Southwest Region. Connect with us on InstagramFacebook, and X.

EPA Announces Bipartisan Infrastructure Law Funds for Cleanup at Tutu Wellfields in St. Thomas, USVI

Tue, 02/27/2024 - 19:00

NEW YORK - Today, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) announced that the Tutu Wellfield in St. Thomas, U.S. Virgin Islands is among the over 100 sites across the country getting more than $1 billion for cleanup projects as part of President Biden’s Investing in America agenda. This funding is made possible by the President’s Bipartisan Infrastructure Law and will launch new cleanup projects at 25 Superfund sites and continue other cleanups at over 85 Superfund sites.  

Thousands of contaminated sites exist nationally due to hazardous waste being dumped, left out in the open, or otherwise improperly managed. These sites can include toxic chemicals from manufacturing facilities, processing plants, landfills and mining, and can harm the health and well-being of local communities in urban and rural areas. More than one in four Black and Hispanic Americans live within three miles of a Superfund site.  

"While we have addressed much of the risk posed by Tutu Wellfields, this funding will help us complete the job by addressing more recently discovered contamination that is spreading slowly over time,” said Regional Administrator Lisa F. Garcia. “This investment in America and in the U.S. Virgin Islands builds on the historic progress we have already made in recent years to ensure that communities living near the most serious uncontrolled, or abandoned contaminated sites get the protections they deserve.”  

"Today marks a historic moment for the U.S. Virgin Islands as we celebrate the inclusion of the Tutu Wellfield in the Bipartisan Infrastructure Law championed by President Biden. This legislation is a beacon of hope, promising to breathe new life into our environmental restoration efforts. With this law, USEPA is poised to launch critical cleanup projects at 25 Superfund sites, including the Tutu Wellfield, and continue ongoing efforts at over 85 Superfund sites. Our commitment to safeguarding our land, water, and air is unwavering, and this funding will empower us to address contamination, restore ecosystems, and protect public health,” said U.S. Virgin Islands Governor Bryan. “I extend my deepest gratitude to President Biden and his administration, and all those who worked tirelessly to make this legislation a reality. Let us move forward with purpose, knowing that our actions today shape the legacy we leave behind. The U.S. Virgin Islands is ready to lead the way toward a cleaner, greener, and more sustainable future."

“President Biden’s vision of making major investments to build resilience against climate change continues to come to fruition here in our territory with another award from the Inflation Reduction Act. The Tutu Wellfield in St. Thomas has long posed significant environmental hazards due to its industrial contamination, and I commend the EPA for identifying it for action,” said Representative Stacey Plaskett. “We know that there are other sites like this one across our territory and it is my hope that this will be one of many EPA funding awards for much needed environmental remediation in the Virgin Islands.”

The Tutu Wellfield site is located in the Anna’s Retreat section of St. Thomas, United States Virgin Islands. The site was used for textile manufacturing and industrial-scale dry cleaning from 1969-1978. Industrial waste, including spent dry-cleaning waste, drums, and floor drain discharge were released from the site and contaminated groundwater with chlorinated volatile organic compounds (CVOCs), including Trichloroethylene (TCE), Tetrachloroethylene (PCE) and vinyl chloride. EPA constructed a groundwater treatment facility in 2004 to address contaminated groundwater.  In 2018, EPA determined that this system needed to be expanded and enhanced.  

EPA BIL funding will be used to expand the existing groundwater pump and treat system to include additional wells and upgrade all existing treatment equipment to accommodate additional flow rates and address the source of contamination more efficiently. The work to expand and enhance the system is estimated to cost about $14 million. 

Today’s investment is the final wave of funding from the $3.5 billion allocated for Superfund cleanup work in the President’s Bipartisan Infrastructure Law. So far, EPA has deployed more than $2 billion for cleanup activities at more than 150 Superfund National Priorities List sites. Thanks President Biden’s commitment to addressing legacy pollution and improving public health, EPA has been able to provide as much funding for cleanup work in the past two years as it did in the previous five years while delivering on President Biden’s Justice40 Initiative, which set a goal to deliver 40% of the overall benefits of certain federal investments to disadvantaged communities that are marginalized by underinvestment and overburdened by pollution. 

EPA is committed to advancing environmental justice and incorporating equity considerations into all aspects of the Superfund cleanup process.  Thus far, nearly 80% of the funding from the Bipartisan Infrastructure Law has gone to sites in communities with potential environmental justice concerns. Out of the 25 sites to receive funding for new cleanup projects, more than 75% are in communities with potential environmental justice concerns based on data from EJSCREEN

President Biden’s Investing in America agenda is restoring the health and economic vitality of communities that have been exposed to pervasive legacy pollution. The historic investment made by the Bipartisan Infrastructure Law strengthens every part of the Superfund program, making a dramatic difference in EPA’s ability to tackle threats to human health and the environment. In addition to funding cleanup construction work, the investment is enabling EPA to increase funding for and accelerate essential work needed to prepare sites for construction and to ensure communities are meaningfully involved in the cleanup process. In 2023, EPA continued to fund Superfund pre-construction activities such as remedial investigations, feasibility studies, remedial designs, and community involvement at double pre-Bipartisan Infrastructure Law levels. 

In 1980, Congress passed the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERLCA), known as Superfund. The law gave EPA the authority and funds to hold polluters accountable for cleaning up the most contaminated sites across the country. When no viable responsible party is found or cannot afford the cleanup, EPA steps in to address risks to human health and the environment using funds appropriated by Congress, like the funding provided by the Bipartisan Infrastructure Law. 

To see a list of the 25 sites to receive funding for new cleanup projects, visit EPA’s Superfund webpage.

To see highlights from the first two years of Bipartisan Infrastructure Law funding at Superfund sites, visit EPA’s Cleaning Up Superfund Sites: Highlights of Bipartisan Infrastructure Law Funding website.

For more information about EPA’s Superfund program, visit EPA’s Superfund website

Follow EPA Region 2 on X and visit our Facebook page. For more information about EPA Region 2, visit our website.  

24-17

EPA Invests $1 Million in New York State Communities Through UAlbany-Led Community Air Monitoring Projects

Mon, 02/26/2024 - 19:00

ALBANY, N.Y.  – Communities in New York’s Capital District and in other areas of New York will get valuable data from two air monitoring projects funded by $1 million from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) under its efforts to invest in communities across America. EPA recently awarded the money to the University at Albany (UAlbany) for two community air quality monitoring projects that will measure and reduce exposure to air pollutants that affect public health. The funding is part of the Biden-Harris Administration’s historic investment of $53.4 million in 132 air monitoring projects in 37 states, funded by the American Rescue Plan and the Inflation Reduction Act, to enhance air quality monitoring in communities that are underserved and overburdened by pollution.

To celebrate the awards, EPA joined U.S. Rep. Paul Tonko, Albany Mayor Kathy Sheehan and other local stakeholders at Giffen Memorial Elementary School, a future air monitoring site in Albany’s South End. UAlbany researchers displayed an example of a low-cost air monitor and led a demonstration of their mobile air monitoring van.

“Air pollution is a serious threat to the health and well-being of millions of Americans, especially those who live in communities that are disproportionately exposed to harmful emissions. The Biden-Harris Administration is committed to investing in community-based solutions that help improve air quality, protect public health, and advance environmental justice,” said EPA Regional Administrator Lisa F. Garcia. “These air monitoring projects are examples of how we can partner with local stakeholders to support communities with data and tools they need to address their air quality challenges and achieve their environmental goals.”

Department of Environmental Conservation Commissioner Basil Seggos said, “DEC applauds the Biden-Harris Administration, EPA Administrator Michael Regan, and Regional Administrator Lisa Garcia for their continued commitment to improving air quality, combating climate change, and prioritizing environmental justice. The $1 million announced today will complement ongoing efforts like DEC’s successful Community Air Monitoring Initiative to obtain localized data that will help assess the air quality in neighborhoods here in Albany and across the state.” 

“I’m thrilled to celebrate this major federal investment that will enable the University at Albany to conduct critical community air quality monitoring projects here in our Capital Region and across New York State,” Congressman Paul Tonko said. “Ever since I welcomed EPA Administrator Regan to speak with residents and community leaders at Albany’s South End about the importance of addressing inequities and environmental injustice, we’ve been committed to helping alleviate those burdens and build healthier communities. These awards are an example of taking in those important conversations and transforming them into meaningful action. Thanks to our American Rescue Plan and our Inflation Reduction Act, we are making significant strides to ensure that our families have clean air to breathe. I’m grateful to EPA for recognizing this need and taking steps to meet it, and I look forward to the tremendous positive impact these projects will have on our Capital Region communities.”

Albany Mayor Kathy Sheehan said, "When I first became Mayor, I worked tirelessly to secure air monitoring in Albany's South End through a partnership with the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation. That study showed that our South End neighbors are disproportionately impacted by particulates from truck traffic. The information gleaned from that study was one of the ways we were able to convince large-volume vehicle operators to change their route away from Ezra Prentice and to advocate for a replacement of the Port of Albany road so we can eventually ban truck traffic from Pearl Street. This effort led by Biden-Harris Administration and the EPA in conjunction with SUNY University at Albany and the Albany City School District will help us understand whether our past efforts are still working and identify what additional pollutants - both outdoors and indoors - are present in one of our most historically underserved communities. I applaud President Biden, Vice President Harris, Congressman Tonko, and our state and local partners for engaging in this important project."

“The University at Albany is proud to partner on the EPA’s largest investment for community air monitoring in its history,” said Thenkurussi (Kesh) Kesavadas, UAlbany Vice President for Research & Economic Development. “Air quality is a serious problem that is expected to worsen through climate change. These two projects, led by faculty at our nationally renowned Atmospheric Sciences Research Center and College of Nanotechnology, Science, and Engineering, will play a key role in helping inform policy decisions and protecting vulnerable populations, including those in underserved communities who often experience higher pollution exposure levels.”

"We're excited to be part of this important work that's happening in our community and in the South End in particular," said City School District of Albany Superintendent Joseph Hochreiter. "We're also grateful to the EPA, UAlbany, and our partners in city, state and federal government for their focus on improving air quality for all of us."

In August 2021, Congressman Tonko hosted EPA Administrator Michael S. Regan during a visit to the Capital Region to highlight a number of key priorities the EPA has championed, including clean water infrastructure and environmental justice. During this tour, the Administrator and Congressman held an environmental justice discussion at Ezra Prentice Homes, where they heard insights from residents and pledged federal action and support for investments in public health protections and pollution reductions in the communities that need them most.

Today’s announcement highlights EPA awards of nearly $500,000 each to two UAlbany projects. The goal of the projects, led by researchers at UAlbany, is to improve air quality and public health across underserved neighborhoods across New York State.

  • NY Capital District Communities Air Quality Measurement Network. Working closely with local partners, UAlbany researchers will use low-cost sensors to measure the air quality inside and outside five community schools, such as the Giffen Memorial School, and use a mobile lab to provide accurate measurements. The researchers will analyze the data to estimate people’s exposure to air pollution inside and outside their homes and suggest ways to make the air cleaner and healthier. The project partners are Healthy Schools Network and the City School District of Albany. The project covers five areas: Northeast Albany, South Albany, Northwest Albany, North Troy, and East Schenectady. The air monitors will measure carbon monoxide, nitrogen oxides, ozone, fine particles and volatile organic compounds.
  • Promoting Sustainable Air Quality at Underserved Neighborhoods in New York State. UAlbany researchers will use low-cost sensors to measure the air quality inside and outside people’s homes in underserved neighborhoods in the Capital District, Hudson Valley and Harlem. The researchers will work with community leaders to understand and improve the air quality and public health. The project covers seven areas: South End in Albany, Schenectady, Cohoes, Kingston, Poughkeepsie, Newburgh, and Harlem in Manhattan. The air monitors will measure black carbon, carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide, ozone, nitrogen oxides, fine particles, volatile organic compounds, and other air toxics.  

Learn more about these and other winners on EPA’s American Rescue Plan’s Enhanced Air Quality Monitoring Competitive Grant webpage.

Air Monitoring and Air Quality Sensors Grants under the Inflation Reduction Act

The funding EPA announced today is one piece of the overall Inflation Reduction Act approach to improving air monitoring across the country. On Feb. 16, EPA announced the availability of an additional $81 million in funding for eligible air agencies to expand and upgrade the nation’s air quality monitoring networks, as well as approximately $2 million in funding to support state, local, territorial and Tribal agencies in the deployment and operation of air quality sensors in low-income and disadvantaged communities across the United States. Together, these investments will provide critical resources to ensure the sustainability of national air quality monitoring networks, helping protect human health and the environment and ensuring Americans are breathing cleaner air.

EPA encourages eligible entities to apply for funding as soon as possible and no later than April 8, 2024. Details about the application process are available on EPA’s Air Quality and Air Quality Sensors Grants website.

Find out more by visiting EPA’s Air Grants and Funding webpage.  

Follow EPA Region 2 on X and visit our Facebook page. For more information about EPA Region 2, visit our website.

EPA takes action against three New England companies for Federal Insecticide, Fungicide, and Rodenticide Act violations 

Mon, 02/26/2024 - 19:00

BOSTON (Feb.26, 2024) – Three New England-based companies have agreed to pay penalties to settle claims by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency that they violated federal law for failure to file required annual pesticide production reports.

Recently, EPA Region 1 filed Settlement Agreements involving three companies; Seaman Paper Company of Massachusetts, Inc., from Gardner, Mass.; Ferti Technologies CT Corp, from Wallingford, Conn.; and Exoban, LLC, from Thomaston, Conn.for alleged violations of the Federal Insecticide, Fungicide, and Rodenticide Act (FIFRA), the law that regulates pesticide production and use in the United States.

The three companies all failed to file production reports for the reporting year 2021, and were issued Notice of Warnings; however, all three companies again failed to file production reports for the reporting year 2022, which led to these enforcement actions and penalties. The assessed penalties were based, in part, on the size of the respective company and were as follows: Seaman $1,400; Ferti $1,000; and Exoban $500.

EPA requires that companies which produce pesticides, active ingredients, or devices submit annual production reports by March 1 for the preceding calendar year. EPA uses these reports for compliance, risk assessment, and risk reduction activities which are important for protecting human health and the environment.

Background

EPA regulates all pesticide products used in the U.S. to ensure that uses described on product labels can be used without harming people's health or the environment. The settlements agreed to with each company address alleged violations of FIFRA for failure to file or timely file annual pesticide production report(s) in connection with each registered establishment. Without annual production reports, EPA cannot determine where and in what manner pesticidal products are being produced, sold, and distributed. FIFRA Section 7 reporting requirements are enforced federally and are not delegated to the states.

More information:

Federal Insecticide, Fungicide and Rodenticide Act Section 7(c) Expedited Settlement Agreement Program (pdf) (2.7 MB): https://www.epa.gov/sites/production/files/2019-09/documents/finalfifra7cesaprogram.pdf 
Enforcement Response Policy for FIFRA Section 7(c) Establishment Reporting Requirements (pdf) (142 KB): https://www.epa.gov/sites/default/files/documents/fifra-erp-section7-051910.pdf
EPA Pesticide Registration Process: https://www.epa.gov/pesticide-registration/about-pesticide-registration

EPA Settles Safe Drinking Water Act Claims with California Resources Corporation and Elk Hills Power

Mon, 02/26/2024 - 19:00

SAN FRANCISCO – Today, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) announced a settlement with California Resources Corporation (CRC) and Elk Hills Power LLC, a subsidiary of CRC, for Safe Drinking Water Act violations at the Elk Hills Power Plant in Tupman, California. CRC and Elk Hills Power have agreed to pay a penalty of $109,000 for permit violations of the Underground Injection Control Program. In addition to paying a penalty, CRC and Elk Hills Power will implement a supplemental environmental project with the local Buttonwillow County Water District valued at a minimum of $282,000.

"Facilities that include underground injection in their operations must comply with all permit conditions in order to protect underground sources of drinking water,” said EPA Pacific Southwest Regional Administrator Martha Guzman.“ Failure to adhere to all permit requirements by owners and operators risks damage to vital groundwater resources.”

Injection wells are used to place fluid underground into porous geologic formations for storage or disposal. EPA’s Underground Injection Control Program works with underground injection well owners and operators to ensure their practices do not impact underground sources of drinking water. EPA conducts regular inspections to verify injection well operations comply with the injection well permits and applicable requirements.

EPA classifies injection wells into one of six types. Elk Hills Power holds an Underground Injection Control permit to dispose of non-hazardous wastewater into the Upper Tulare Formation, an underground source of drinking water, via two Class V injection wells.

Under the order, CRC and Elk Hills Power have agreed to take actions necessary to resolve exceedances of their maximum allowable injections pressure (MAIP). These actions include:

  1. Reduce the injection rate when the injection pressure of any injection well approaches the MAIP;
  2. Cease injection into any well that reaches the MAIP;
  3. Increased reporting;
  4. Submit and implement a compliance plan.

This enforcement action helps ensure continued operation at the Elk Hills Power Plant complies with its underground injection control permit and avoids potential contamination of underground sources of drinking water.

The supplemental environmental project agreed to by CRC and Elk Hills Power will benefit the Buttonwillow County Water District and the local community. Project work includes plugging of a standby drinking water well, demolition of a deteriorating 40,000-gallon metal tank, and installation of a back-up generator and power supply at an active drinking water well.

Read the public notice for the proposed settlement here.

Learn about EPA’s Underground Injection Control Program.

Read how to report possible violations of environmental laws and regulations.

Learn about EPA enforcement and supplemental environmental projects.

Learn about EPA’s Pacific Southwest Region. Connect with us on Facebook, Instagram, and X.

EPA, HUD and HHS announce interagency commitments to more robust collaboration on addressing risks of exposures to lead

Mon, 02/26/2024 - 19:00

WASHINGTONToday, Feb. 26, 2024, the Environmental Protection Agency, U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD), and the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) announced two complementary agreements to further their “whole of government” approach to strengthen these agencies’ shared work in ensuring that children, especially those at high risk, are not exposed to human health risks from lead hazards.

These two Memoranda of Understanding (MOUs) support commitments made in the Lead and Paint Action Plan, EPA’s Strategic Plan , HUD’s Strategic Plan, and HHS’s Strategic Plan, which seek to reduce lead exposures locally with a focus on underserved communities and promote environmental justice through a whole of government approach.

The first MOU expands, updates and reaffirms a 1997 agreement between EPA and HUD to coordinate their enforcement efforts addressing lead-based paint hazards in housing. 

“EPA is committed to working with our federal partners to protect children from the harmful effects of lead poisoning, which remains far too prevalent in communities across America,” said David M. Uhlmann, Assistant Administrator for EPA’s Office of Enforcement and Compliance Assurance. “Today’s agreement demonstrates that EPA and HUD will enforce the law fairly and aggressively to protect children, particularly those living in overburdened and underserved communities, from exposure to lead-based paint in their homes.”

“With this agreement, we will collaborate across the federal government to enforce the laws that aim to ensure the healthy housing future that American children deserve,” said Matthew Ammon, Director of HUD’s Office of Lead Hazard Control and Healthy Homes. “HUD is proud to join our federal partners at EPA to better align our enforcement efforts and ensure that we are protecting families – especially families with limited resources – from lead-based paint hazards in their home.”

The second MOU, signed by EPA, HUD and CDC launches a pilot program in the agencies’ Region 3, which includes Delaware, the District of Columbia, Maryland, Pennsylvania, Virginia and West Virginia, to facilitate information sharing about communities with high blood lead levels or higher lead exposure risks, to help them focus their respective and collaborative efforts working in communities with the greatest risks. The agencies plan to use the knowledge gained from the pilot to expand the scope of this effort. 

“Our three agencies will work together to identify, reach, and assist communities most at risk from exposure to lead,” said EPA Mid-Atlantic Regional Administrator Adam Ortiz. “Through this pilot program, we will develop more effective processes for sharing actionable information on lead exposure, with the goal of alleviating the negative health impacts that still burden too many people across our region.”

“HUD is pleased to collaborate with its EPA and CDC partners on this pilot that we hope will provide the basis for an enhanced national framework for sharing and using information on the sources of lead exposures at the community and even neighborhood levels,” said Ammon. “HUD has a particular interest in using the shared data to facilitate its engagement with state and local lead hazard control programs, healthy homes programs, and housing rehabilitation programs, for the purposes of improving its targeting of funding, conducting special projects, or other collaborations.”

“All children deserve to grow up without lead burdening their minds and bodies” said Aaron Bernstein, Director of CDC’s National Center for Environmental Health, “We are committed to working together to leave no child behind and put an end to lead poisoning.”

Over 1 million children in the United States suffer from the irreversible impacts of lead poisoning, including reduced intelligence, behavioral and learning disabilities, and effects on many other body systems; new cases continue to be diagnosed every year. Lead-contaminated dust from chipped or peeling lead-based paint is one of the most common causes of elevated blood lead levels in children. Adults with exposure to lead can develop symptoms such as high blood pressure, memory loss and reduced motor skills. Infants and children are especially vulnerable to lead paint exposure because their growing bodies absorb more lead than adults do, and their brains and nervous systems are more sensitive to the damaging effects of lead. They can be exposed from multiple sources and may experience irreversible and life-long health effects. 

More than 34 million homes in the US have lead paint somewhere in the building. About 3.3 million homes in the US have children less than six years of age facing one or more lead-based paint hazards, including over 2 million low-income households.

The EPA-HUD Memorandum of Understanding Lead Paint Compliance and Enforcement and the EPA Region 3-HUD-CDC Memorandum of Understanding for sharing of data can both be found on EPA’s Enforcing Lead Laws and Regulations webpage.  

You can find out more about identifying and addressing housing health and safety hazards, including those from lead, on HUD’s Healthy Homes Program website.

Learn more about EPA’s efforts to reduce lead exposure and help protect children from lead paint by identifying and reporting lead paint violations to EPA, or identifying and reporting violations, especially in assisted housing to HUD’s lead reporting email. EPA, HUD and HHS are supporting the 2019 Federal Lead Action Plan, which was designed to reduce exposure to lead and improve children’s health.

Biden-Harris Administration announces over $69 million for Kentucky drinking water, wastewater and stormwater infrastructure upgrades as part of President Biden’s Investing in America agenda

Fri, 02/23/2024 - 19:00

FRANKFORT, Ky. (February 23, 2024) – The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) announced over $69 million from President Biden’s Investing in America agenda for Kentucky drinking water and clean water infrastructure upgrades. The funding is part of the over $50 billion investment in water infrastructure upgrades from President Biden’s Bipartisan Infrastructure Law – the largest such investment in American history. Today’s announcement will support essential water infrastructure that protects public health and treasured water bodies across the state. Almost half of this funding will be available as grants or principal forgiveness loans, ensuring funds reach underserved communities most in need of investments in water infrastructure.

"President Biden's Investing in America agenda continues to transform communities for the better with this latest infusion of funds for critical water infrastructure projects," said EPA Administrator Michael S. Regan. "With $50 billion in total, the largest investment in water infrastructure in our nation's history, EPA will enable communities across the nation to ensure safer drinking water for their residents and rebuild vital clean water infrastructure to protect public health for decades to come."

Improving water infrastructure goes to the heart of Team Kentucky’s efforts to make families and communities healthier, grow jobs and make Kentucky a destination state,” Kentucky Gov. Andy Beshear said. “This funding will make it possible to help communities, especially those most hard hit by recent natural disasters, make lasting improvements to their clean water systems.”

“Everyone deserves clean, safe drinking water,” said US Representative Morgan McGarvey (KY-03). “Thanks to funding from the Bipartisan Infrastructure Law, we can continue updating our water systems to make sure all Kentuckians have clean water. This is essential to keeping our communities healthy, and I’m committed to keep fighting to bring federal dollars back, so Kentuckians have what we need to thrive.”

Communities across the country are facing water infrastructure challenges. Many cities and towns have aging water infrastructure – old, broken or lead pipes carrying drinking water and wastewater treatment plants in need of major upgrades.  Some communities struggle to maintain adequate stormwater infrastructure to effectively manage flood impacts from climate change and others need to upgrade their water treatment to address emerging contaminants like PFAS.

The funding EPA announced for Kentucky is part of a $5.8 billion investment through the Clean Water and Drinking Water State Revolving Funds (SRF), one of EPA’s signature water investment programs. This multi-billion-dollar investment will fund state-run, low-interest loan programs to address key challenges, with $2.6 billion going to the Clean Water SRF for wastewater and stormwater infrastructure and $3.2 billion going to the Drinking Water SRF for drinking water infrastructure nationwide. Today’s announcement includes allotments for Bipartisan Infrastructure Law General Supplemental funds and Emerging Contaminant funds for SRF programs for fiscal year 2024. EPA anticipates announcing allocations for billions of dollars in additional resources for the Bipartisan Infrastructure Law Lead Service Line Replacement fund later this Spring.

Bipartisan Infrastructure Law in Action in Kentucky

Since 2022, the Bipartisan Infrastructure Law has injected over $257 million into water infrastructure projects across Kentucky—protecting public health, preserving water resources, and creating jobs.

To view stories about how the unpreceded investments from the Bipartisan Infrastructure Law are transforming communities across the country, visit EPA's new Investing in America's Water Infrastructure Storymap. To read more about some additional projects that are underway, see EPA's recently released Quarterly Report on Bipartisan Infrastructure Law Funded Clean Water and Drinking Water SRF projects

Background

The Drinking Water State Revolving Funds and the Clean Water State Revolving Funds have been the foundation of water infrastructure investments for more than 30 years, providing low-cost financing for local projects across America. SRF programs are critically important programs for investing in the nation’s water infrastructure. They are designed to generate significant and sustainable water quality and public health benefits across the country. Their impact is amplified by the growth inherent in a revolving loan structure – payment of principal and interest on loans made are available to address future needs.

For more information, including state-by-state allocation of 2024 funding, and a breakdown of EPA State Revolving Fund funding available through the Bipartisan Infrastructure Law, please visit the Drinking Water State Revolving Fund website and the Clean Water State Revolving Fund website.

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Biden-Harris Administration announces over $124 million for Tennessee drinking water, wastewater and stormwater infrastructure upgrades as part of President Biden’s Investing in America agenda

Fri, 02/23/2024 - 19:00

NASHVILLE, Tenn., (February 23, 2024) – The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) announced over $124 million from President Biden’s Investing in America agenda for Tennessee drinking water and clean water infrastructure upgrades. The funding is part of the over $50 billion investment in water infrastructure upgrades from President Biden’s Bipartisan Infrastructure Law – the largest such investment in American history. Today’s announcement will support essential water infrastructure that protects public health and treasured water bodies across the state. Almost half of this funding will be available as grants or principal forgiveness loans, ensuring funds reach underserved communities most in need of investments in water infrastructure.

"President Biden's Investing in America agenda continues to transform communities for the better with this latest infusion of funds for critical water infrastructure projects," said EPA Administrator Michael S. Regan. "With $50 billion in total, the largest investment in water infrastructure in our nation's history, EPA will enable communities across the nation to ensure safer drinking water for their residents and rebuild vital clean water infrastructure to protect public health for decades to come."

“As the only member of the current Tennessee Congressional Delegation to have voted for the Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act (IIJA), and as a senior member of the Transportation and Infrastructure Committee, I’m pleased to see these significant investments in Tennessee’s drinking water and clean water infrastructure. Everyone recognizes the need to make these investments and many who didn’t support them will take credit for them. I’m proud to have acted in Tennessee’s best interests.”, stated US Representative Steve Cohen (TN- 09)

Communities across the country are facing water infrastructure challenges. Many cities and towns have aging water infrastructure – old, broken or lead pipes carrying drinking water and wastewater treatment plants in need of major upgrades.  Some communities struggle to maintain adequate stormwater infrastructure to effectively manage flood impacts from climate change and others need to upgrade their water treatment to address emerging contaminants like PFAS.

The funding EPA announced for Tennessee is part of a $5.8 billion investment through the Clean Water and Drinking Water State Revolving Funds (SRF), one of EPA’s signature water investment programs. This multi-billion-dollar investment will fund state-run, low-interest loan programs to address key challenges, with $2.6 billion going to the Clean Water SRF for wastewater and stormwater infrastructure and $3.2 billion going to the Drinking Water SRF for drinking water infrastructure nationwide. Today’s announcement includes allotments for Bipartisan Infrastructure Law General Supplemental funds and Emerging Contaminant funds for SRF programs for fiscal year 2024. EPA anticipates announcing allocations for billions of dollars in additional resources for the Bipartisan Infrastructure Law Lead Service Line Replacement fund later this Spring.

To view stories about how the unpreceded investments from the Bipartisan Infrastructure Law are transforming communities across the country, visit EPA's new Investing in America's Water Infrastructure Storymap. To read more about some additional projects that are underway, see EPA's recently released Quarterly Report on Bipartisan Infrastructure Law Funded Clean Water and Drinking Water SRF projects

Background

The Drinking Water State Revolving Funds and the Clean Water State Revolving Funds have been the foundation of water infrastructure investments for more than 30 years, providing low-cost financing for local projects across America. SRF programs are critically important programs for investing in the nation’s water infrastructure. They are designed to generate significant and sustainable water quality and public health benefits across the country. Their impact is amplified by the growth inherent in a revolving loan structure – payment of principal and interest on loans made are available to address future needs.

For more information, including state-by-state allocation of 2024 funding, and a breakdown of EPA State Revolving Fund funding available through the Bipartisan Infrastructure Law, please visit the Drinking Water State Revolving Fund website and the Clean Water State Revolving Fund website.

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Biden-Harris Administration announces over $82 million for Alabama drinking water, wastewater and stormwater infrastructure upgrades as part of President Biden’s Investing in America agenda

Fri, 02/23/2024 - 19:00

MONTGOMERY, Ala.  (February 23, 2024) –The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) announced over $82 million from President Biden’s Investing in America agenda for Alabama drinking water and clean water infrastructure upgrades. The funding is part of the over $50 billion investment in water infrastructure upgrades from President Biden’s Bipartisan Infrastructure Law – the largest such investment in American history. Today’s announcement will support essential water infrastructure that protects public health and treasured water bodies across the state. Almost half of this funding will be available as grants or principal forgiveness loans, ensuring funds reach underserved communities most in need of investments in water infrastructure.

"President Biden's Investing in America agenda continues to transform communities for the better with this latest infusion of funds for critical water infrastructure projects," said EPA Administrator Michael S. Regan. "With $50 billion in total, the largest investment in water infrastructure in our nation's history, EPA will enable communities across the nation to ensure safer drinking water for their residents and rebuild vital clean water infrastructure to protect public health for decades to come."

Communities across the country are facing water infrastructure challenges. Many cities and towns have aging water infrastructure – old, broken or lead pipes carrying drinking water and wastewater treatment plants in need of major upgrades.  Some communities struggle to maintain adequate stormwater infrastructure to effectively manage flood impacts from climate change and others need to upgrade their water treatment to address emerging contaminants like PFAS.

The funding EPA announced for Alabama is part of a $5.8 billion investment through the Clean Water and Drinking Water State Revolving Funds (SRF), one of EPA’s signature water investment programs. This multi-billion-dollar investment will fund state-run, low-interest loan programs to address key challenges, with $2.6 billion going to the Clean Water SRF for wastewater and stormwater infrastructure and $3.2 billion going to the Drinking Water SRF for drinking water infrastructure nationwide. Today’s announcement includes allotments for Bipartisan Infrastructure Law General Supplemental funds and Emerging Contaminant funds for SRF programs for fiscal year 2024. EPA anticipates announcing allocations for billions of dollars in additional resources for the Bipartisan Infrastructure Law Lead Service Line Replacement fund later this Spring.

Bipartisan Infrastructure Law in Action in Alabama

Since 2022, the Bipartisan Infrastructure Law has injected over $537 million into water infrastructure projects across Alabama—protecting public health, preserving water resources, and creating jobs- including:

  • Greene County, AL -In partnership with EPA WaterTA, Greene County is evaluating their wastewater treatment options to protect public health and improve quality of life. So far, they have received $775,000 in funding to plan wastewater needs for unincorporated areas of the community and prioritize project implementation. This funding is primarily a grant through ADEM SRF using ARPA funding. (Funding: This is a WaterTA community that is actively pursuing funding.)
  • $8.7 million to Hayneville, AL – 650 homes in Hayneville will be able to address their wastewater challenges and protect families health and well-being.

To view stories about how the unpreceded investments from the Bipartisan Infrastructure Law are transforming communities across the country, visit EPA's new Investing in America's Water Infrastructure Storymap. To read more about some additional projects that are underway, see EPA's recently released Quarterly Report on Bipartisan Infrastructure Law Funded Clean Water and Drinking Water SRF projects.

Background

The Drinking Water State Revolving Funds and the Clean Water State Revolving Funds have been the foundation of water infrastructure investments for more than 30 years, providing low-cost financing for local projects across America. SRF programs are critically important programs for investing in the nation’s water infrastructure. They are designed to generate significant and sustainable water quality and public health benefits across the country. Their impact is amplified by the growth inherent in a revolving loan structure – payment of principal and interest on loans made are available to address future needs.

For more information, including state-by-state allocation of 2024 funding, and a breakdown of EPA State Revolving Fund funding available through the Bipartisan Infrastructure Law, please visit the Drinking Water State Revolving Fund website and the Clean Water State Revolving Fund website.

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Biden-Harris Administration announces over $361 million in funding for Florida drinking water, wastewater and stormwater infrastructure upgrades as part of President Biden’s Investing in America agenda

Fri, 02/23/2024 - 19:00

TALLAHASSEE, Fla. (February 23, 2024) –The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) announced over $361 million from President Biden’s Investing in America agenda for Florida drinking water and clean water infrastructure upgrades. The funding is part of the over $50 billion investment in water infrastructure upgrades from President Biden’s Bipartisan Infrastructure Law – the largest such investment in American history. Today’s announcement will support essential water infrastructure that protects public health and treasured water bodies across the state. Almost half of this funding will be available as grants or principal forgiveness loans, ensuring funds reach underserved communities most in need of investments in water infrastructure.

"President Biden's Investing in America agenda continues to transform communities for the better with this latest infusion of funds for critical water infrastructure projects," said EPA Administrator Michael S. Regan. "With $50 billion in total, the largest investment in water infrastructure in our nation's history, EPA will enable communities across the nation to ensure safer drinking water for their residents and rebuild vital clean water infrastructure to protect public health for decades to come."

"Florida, particularly South Florida, stands at the forefront of the climate crisis. The impacts of climate change are an ever-present reality for our residents as we experience some of the costliest natural disasters and climate-related events, including flooding. The erosion of our water infrastructure and the risk of the Biscayne Aquifer, South Florida's primary source of clean drinking water, underscore how urgent this crisis is. Today's announcement by the Biden-Harris Administration marks a significant victory for Florida and our local community, ensuring that the fundamental right to clean drinking water remains safeguarded. We now have the power to transform our communities by ensuring that access to clean water will never be a privilege but a basic necessity that every individual deserves. I thank President Biden and EPA Administrator Michael Regan for prioritizing Florida and ensuring we can address the challenges to accessing clean drinking water. Together, we can forge a path towards a more sustainable and resilient future for our state," said US Representative Frederica S. Wilson (FL-24).

“As we saw last April during a historic flood that hit the heart of Florida’s 20th Congressional District, there is an urgent need to modernize South Florida’s water infrastructure,” said US Representative Sheila Cherfilus-McCormick (FL- 20). “This unprecedented investment from the Biden-Harris Administration will not only make our communities more resilient but will also expand access to clean drinking water. The Bipartisan Infrastructure Law continues to deliver for South Florida families.

“We are proud to continue seeing the Infrastructure Law make historical impacts in our state. With these investments, we look forward to seeing more clean water accessibility and removal of lead pipes in Central Florida, improved water quality to support wildlife and recreation, and more. House Democrats will keep working with the U.S. EPA to deliver real solutions for the American people,” said US Representative Darren Soto (FL-09).

Communities across the country are facing water infrastructure challenges. Many cities and towns have aging water infrastructure – old, broken or lead pipes carrying drinking water and wastewater treatment plants in need of major upgrades.  Some communities struggle to maintain adequate stormwater infrastructure to effectively manage flood impacts from climate change and others need to upgrade their water treatment to address emerging contaminants like PFAS.

The funding EPA announced for Alabama is part of a $5.8 billion investment through the Clean Water and Drinking Water State Revolving Funds (SRF), one of EPA’s signature water investment programs. This multi-billion-dollar investment will fund state-run, low-interest loan programs to address key challenges, with $2.6 billion going to the Clean Water SRF for wastewater and stormwater infrastructure and $3.2 billion going to the Drinking Water SRF for drinking water infrastructure nationwide. Today’s announcement includes allotments for Bipartisan Infrastructure Law General Supplemental funds and Emerging Contaminant funds for SRF programs for fiscal year 2024. EPA anticipates announcing allocations for billions of dollars in additional resources for the Bipartisan Infrastructure Law Lead Service Line Replacement fund later this Spring.

Bipartisan Infrastructure Law in Action in Florida

Since 2022, the Bipartisan Infrastructure Law has injected over $537 million into water infrastructure projects across Florida—protecting public health, preserving water resources, and creating jobs.

To view stories about how the unpreceded investments from the Bipartisan Infrastructure Law are transforming communities across the country, visit EPA's new Investing in America's Water Infrastructure Storymap. To read more about some additional projects that are underway, see EPA's recently released Quarterly Report on Bipartisan Infrastructure Law Funded Clean Water and Drinking Water SRF projects.

Background

The Drinking Water State Revolving Funds and the Clean Water State Revolving Funds have been the foundation of water infrastructure investments for more than 30 years, providing low-cost financing for local projects across America. SRF programs are critically important programs for investing in the nation’s water infrastructure. They are designed to generate significant and sustainable water quality and public health benefits across the country. Their impact is amplified by the growth inherent in a revolving loan structure – payment of principal and interest on loans made are available to address future needs.

For more information, including state-by-state allocation of 2024 funding, and a breakdown of EPA State Revolving Fund funding available through the Bipartisan Infrastructure Law, please visit the Drinking Water State Revolving Fund website and the Clean Water State Revolving Fund website.

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Biden-Harris Administration announces over $125 million for Georgia drinking water, wastewater and stormwater infrastructure upgrades as part of President Biden’s Investing in America agenda

Fri, 02/23/2024 - 19:00

ATLANTA (February 23, 2024) – The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) announced over $125 million from President Biden’s Investing in America agenda for Georgia drinking water and clean water infrastructure upgrades. The funding is part of the over $50 billion investment in water infrastructure upgrades from President Biden’s Bipartisan Infrastructure Law – the largest such investment in American history. Today’s announcement will support essential water infrastructure that protects public health and treasured water bodies across the state. Almost half of this funding will be available as grants or principal forgiveness loans, ensuring funds reach underserved communities most in need of investments in water infrastructure.

"President Biden's Investing in America agenda continues to transform communities for the better with this latest infusion of funds for critical water infrastructure projects," said EPA Administrator Michael S. Regan. "With $50 billion in total, the largest investment in water infrastructure in our nation's history, EPA will enable communities across the nation to ensure safer drinking water for their residents and rebuild vital clean water infrastructure to protect public health for decades to come."

“Senator Raphael Warnock and I are delivering water infrastructure upgrades to remove lead pipes from our drinking water and keep our families safe and healthy,” said U.S. Senator Jon Ossoff. “Our bipartisan infrastructure law will deliver long-overdue upgrades to Georgia’s infrastructure for years to come. I thank President Biden, Vice President Harris, and EPA Administrator Regan for their continued collaboration as we lead Georgia forward.”

“Access to safe, clean drinking water is a right all Americans expect and deserve,” said U.S. Representative Hank Johnson (GA-04), a senior member of the House Transportation & Infrastructure Committee. “This week’s announcement that President Biden – thanks to the Bipartisan Infrastructure Law that I supported – is investing $50 billion through the EPA in water infrastructure upgrades across the United States, including $125 million for Georgia, is a giant step forward addressing toxic lead pipes, improving to our wastewater and sanitation infrastructure, and removing PFAS contamination or ‘forever chemicals’ in our drinking water.”

“Prioritizing water infrastructure upgrades has been a top focus during my tenure in Congress. Whether that be through my Community Project Funding submissions or championing the Bipartisan Infrastructure Law to make these investments for Georgia possible, my commitment is unwavering,” said U.S. Representative David Scott (GA-13). “The health and prosperity of our Georgia communities is intricately linked to the state of our water resources. I look forward to continuing to work with the Biden Administration to ensure that the much-needed funding for water infrastructure reaches GA-13 and beyond.”

"The Bipartisan Infrastructure Law is an investment in our communities' well-being. With a focus on water infrastructure, it's a beacon of hope for marginalized areas long neglected,” said U.S. Representative Nikema Williams (GA-05). “This historic funding is critical for communities that have been forced to use intentionally underfunded water infrastructure. Thanks to the Biden-Harris administration's continued work to ensure clean water is no longer a privilege but a right for all - no matter your ZIP Code, no matter your bank account.”

"Access to safe, clean drinking water is a fundamental need for all, and our infrastructure must modernize to protect this resource for our families," said U.S. Representative Lucy McBath (D-GA). "I'm proud to see the Biden-Harris Administration and the EPA announce historic investments in Georgia's drinking water as part of the Bipartisan Infrastructure Law. Together, the Biden-Harris Administration and Congress are working to rebuild our water infrastructure and support the American people."

Communities across the country are facing water infrastructure challenges. Many cities and towns have aging water infrastructure – old, broken or lead pipes carrying drinking water and wastewater treatment plants in need of major upgrades.  Some communities struggle to maintain adequate stormwater infrastructure to effectively manage flood impacts from climate change and others need to upgrade their water treatment to address emerging contaminants like PFAS.

The funding EPA announced for Georgia is part of a $5.8 billion investment through the Clean Water and Drinking Water State Revolving Funds (SRF), one of EPA’s signature water investment programs. This multi-billion-dollar investment will fund state-run, low-interest loan programs to address key challenges, with $2.6 billion going to the Clean Water SRF for wastewater and stormwater infrastructure and $3.2 billion going to the Drinking Water SRF for drinking water infrastructure nationwide. Today’s announcement includes allotments for Bipartisan Infrastructure Law General Supplemental funds and Emerging Contaminant funds for SRF programs for fiscal year 2024. EPA anticipates announcing allocations for billions of dollars in additional resources for the Bipartisan Infrastructure Law Lead Service Line Replacement fund later this Spring.

Bipartisan Infrastructure Law in Action in Georgia

Since 2022, the Bipartisan Infrastructure Law has injected over $430 million into water infrastructure projects across Georgia—protecting public health, preserving water resources, and creating jobs- including:

  • $1.5 million to Dalton, GA- Dalton Utilities will conduct a series of pilot projects to test the effectiveness of various PFAS removal and destruction technologies.

To view stories about how the unpreceded investments from the Bipartisan Infrastructure Law are transforming communities across the country, visit EPA's new Investing in America's Water Infrastructure Storymap. To read more about some additional projects that are underway, see EPA's recently released Quarterly Report on Bipartisan Infrastructure Law Funded Clean Water and Drinking Water SRF projects

Background

The Drinking Water State Revolving Funds and the Clean Water State Revolving Funds have been the foundation of water infrastructure investments for more than 30 years, providing low-cost financing for local projects across America. SRF programs are critically important programs for investing in the nation’s water infrastructure. They are designed to generate significant and sustainable water quality and public health benefits across the country. Their impact is amplified by the growth inherent in a revolving loan structure – payment of principal and interest on loans made are available to address future needs.

For more information, including state-by-state allocation of 2024 funding, and a breakdown of EPA State Revolving Fund funding available through the Bipartisan Infrastructure Law, please visit the Drinking Water State Revolving Fund website and the Clean Water State Revolving Fund website.

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Biden-Harris Administration announces over $361million for Florida drinking water, wastewater and stormwater infrastructure upgrades as part of President Biden’s Investing in America agenda

Fri, 02/23/2024 - 19:00

TALLAHASSEE, Fla. (February 23, 2024) –The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) announced over $361 million from President Biden’s Investing in America agenda for Florida drinking water and clean water infrastructure upgrades. The funding is part of the over $50 billion investment in water infrastructure upgrades from President Biden’s Bipartisan Infrastructure Law – the largest such investment in American history. Today’s announcement will support essential water infrastructure that protects public health and treasured water bodies across the state. Almost half of this funding will be available as grants or principal forgiveness loans, ensuring funds reach underserved communities most in need of investments in water infrastructure.

"President Biden's Investing in America agenda continues to transform communities for the better with this latest infusion of funds for critical water infrastructure projects," said EPA Administrator Michael S. Regan. "With $50 billion in total, the largest investment in water infrastructure in our nation's history, EPA will enable communities across the nation to ensure safer drinking water for their residents and rebuild vital clean water infrastructure to protect public health for decades to come."

"Florida, particularly South Florida, stands at the forefront of the climate crisis. The impacts of climate change are an ever-present reality for our residents as we experience some of the costliest natural disasters and climate-related events, including flooding. The erosion of our water infrastructure and the risk of the Biscayne Aquifer, South Florida's primary source of clean drinking water, underscore how urgent this crisis is. Today's announcement by the Biden-Harris Administration marks a significant victory for Florida and our local community, ensuring that the fundamental right to clean drinking water remains safeguarded. We now have the power to transform our communities by ensuring that access to clean water will never be a privilege but a basic necessity that every individual deserves. I thank President Biden and EPA Administrator Michael Regan for prioritizing Florida and ensuring we can address the challenges to accessing clean drinking water. Together, we can forge a path towards a more sustainable and resilient future for our state," said US Representative Frederica S. Wilson (FL-24).

“As we saw last April during a historic flood that hit the heart of Florida’s 20th Congressional District, there is an urgent need to modernize South Florida’s water infrastructure,” said US Representative Sheila Cherfilus-McCormick (FL- 20). “This unprecedented investment from the Biden-Harris Administration will not only make our communities more resilient but will also expand access to clean drinking water. The Bipartisan Infrastructure Law continues to deliver for South Florida families.

“We are proud to continue seeing the Infrastructure Law make historical impacts in our state. With these investments, we look forward to seeing more clean water accessibility and removal of lead pipes in Central Florida, improved water quality to support wildlife and recreation, and more. House Democrats will keep working with the U.S. EPA to deliver real solutions for the American people,” said US Representative Darren Soto (FL-09).

Communities across the country are facing water infrastructure challenges. Many cities and towns have aging water infrastructure – old, broken or lead pipes carrying drinking water and wastewater treatment plants in need of major upgrades.  Some communities struggle to maintain adequate stormwater infrastructure to effectively manage flood impacts from climate change and others need to upgrade their water treatment to address emerging contaminants like PFAS.

The funding EPA announced for Alabama is part of a $5.8 billion investment through the Clean Water and Drinking Water State Revolving Funds (SRF), one of EPA’s signature water investment programs. This multi-billion-dollar investment will fund state-run, low-interest loan programs to address key challenges, with $2.6 billion going to the Clean Water SRF for wastewater and stormwater infrastructure and $3.2 billion going to the Drinking Water SRF for drinking water infrastructure nationwide. Today’s announcement includes allotments for Bipartisan Infrastructure Law General Supplemental funds and Emerging Contaminant funds for SRF programs for fiscal year 2024. EPA anticipates announcing allocations for billions of dollars in additional resources for the Bipartisan Infrastructure Law Lead Service Line Replacement fund later this Spring.

Bipartisan Infrastructure Law in Action in Florida

Since 2022, the Bipartisan Infrastructure Law has injected over $537 million into water infrastructure projects across Florida—protecting public health, preserving water resources, and creating jobs.

To view stories about how the unpreceded investments from the Bipartisan Infrastructure Law are transforming communities across the country, visit EPA's new Investing in America's Water Infrastructure Storymap. To read more about some additional projects that are underway, see EPA's recently released Quarterly Report on Bipartisan Infrastructure Law Funded Clean Water and Drinking Water SRF projects.

Background

The Drinking Water State Revolving Funds and the Clean Water State Revolving Funds have been the foundation of water infrastructure investments for more than 30 years, providing low-cost financing for local projects across America. SRF programs are critically important programs for investing in the nation’s water infrastructure. They are designed to generate significant and sustainable water quality and public health benefits across the country. Their impact is amplified by the growth inherent in a revolving loan structure – payment of principal and interest on loans made are available to address future needs.

For more information, including state-by-state allocation of 2024 funding, and a breakdown of EPA State Revolving Fund funding available through the Bipartisan Infrastructure Law, please visit the Drinking Water State Revolving Fund website and the Clean Water State Revolving Fund website.

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