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EPA Region 7 Announces Finalization of Climate Adaptation Implementation Plan

EPA Air - Mon, 10/17/2022 - 19:00

LENEXA, KAN. (OCT. 17, 2022) – The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Region 7 has released its Climate Adaptation Implementation Plan, as part of the Agency’s response to President Biden’s Executive Order 14008: Tackling the Climate Crisis at Home and Abroad.

EPA Region 7’s Climate Adaptation Implementation Plan outlines the priority actions the Region will undertake to align with the five EPA-wide climate adaption priorities laid out in the 2021 EPA Climate Adaptation Action Plan. These priority actions will be essential to protecting human health and the environment in the nation’s agricultural heartland.

“Tackling the climate crisis presents an important opportunity to bolster our economy, put people back to work, and build a healthier, more equitable environment for all communities across our nation’s heartland,” said EPA Region 7 Administrator Meg McCollister. “Our Climate Adaptation Implementation Plan commits Region 7 to meet our partners where they are – in our rural communities and metropolitan areas – to address our region’s climate challenges with actions that build climate resilience and protect our most vulnerable communities from the impacts of climate change.”

The release of EPA Region 7’s Climate Adaptation Implementation Plan coincides with the release of other plans developed by the Agency’s major offices, including national program offices and all 10 regional offices. These Implementation Plans reaffirm the strong commitments made in EPA’s 2021 Climate Adaptation Action Plan to address the devastating impacts of climate change on communities across the nation, while advancing environmental justice and equity. These Implementation Plans are dynamic documents that will be updated as new data becomes available and new actions are defined.

“Traveling across the country, I’ve seen firsthand the devastating impacts that climate change is having on millions of Americans. We need to take actions to ensure a safe, resilient, and equitable future,” said EPA Administrator Michael S. Regan. “The Biden-Harris administration is confronting the climate crisis through a whole-of-government approach. The release of the Implementation Plans today marks significant progress in EPA’s efforts to ensure we are doing everything we can to protect human health and the environment.”

The Climate Adaptation Implementation Plans build upon the historic investments made by President Biden’s Bipartisan Infrastructure Law and the Inflation Reduction Act by providing a roadmap for the specific actions the Agency will take in the years ahead to ensure it continues to protect human health and the environment event as the climate changes, and to partner with states, tribes, territories, local governments, and communities of all sizes to strengthen their ability to anticipate, prepare for, adapt to, and recover from the impacts of climate change.

These plans include over 400 commitments to ensure clean air, water, land, and chemical safety even as the climate changes. They also identify strategies that deliver co-benefits for mitigation of greenhouse gases and other pollution, public health, economic growth, national security, equity, and environmental justice – all central to building a more resilient future.

The Implementation Plans recognize that climate disruption often hits already overburdened communities and people the hardest. The plans also consider the disproportionate impacts on those who are already overburdened and underserved in our society, including low-income communities and communities of color, children, the elderly, tribes, and indigenous people. EPA is already engaging and will continue to engage with underserved and vulnerable communities to ensure that actions taken follow the principles of environmental justice and equity.

Read EPA Region 7’s Climate Adaptation Implementation Plan.

Read more information on EPA’s 2021 Climate Adaptation Action Plan.

View all 20 Climate Adaptation Implementation Plans that were developed by EPA’s major offices.

Read President Biden’s Executive Order on Tackling the Climate Crisis at Home and Abroad.

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Learn more about EPA Region 7

View all Region 7 news releases

Connect with EPA Region 7 on Facebook

Follow us on Twitter: @EPARegion7​​​​​​

Tomorrow: EPA to Hold Open Houses and Community Meetings for Memphis Residents about Health Risks from Ethylene Oxide

EPA Air - Mon, 10/17/2022 - 19:00

MEMPHIS, Tenn. (October 17, 2022) - On October 18, 2022, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) will host two open houses and community meetings at the Monumental Baptist Church at 704 S Pkwy E, Memphis, Tenn. to provide residents an opportunity to learn more about commercial sterilizers that release high levels of a chemical called ethylene oxide (EtO) into the air, including Sterilization Services of TN (SST) located at 2396 Florida Street in Memphis 

EPA is sharing this information because communities have a right to know about emissions that could affect their health and well-being. EPA will host two open houses and community meetings at the following times:

Open House: 10 a.m. to 11 a.m.

* In-person only

Community Meeting: 11:15 a.m. to 12:45 p.m.

In person: Monumental Baptist Church, located at 704 S Pkwy E in Memphis

By phone: Call in number: (883) 435-1820; Webinar ID: 1614966124

Online via Zoom: https://bit.ly/3DnGFTQ

Open House: 6 p.m. to 7 p.m.

* In-person only

Community Meeting 7:15p.m. 8:45 p.m.

In person: Monumental Baptist Church, located at 704 S Pkwy E in Memphis

By phone: Call in number: (883) 568-8864; Webinar ID: 1617052397

Online via Zoom: https://bit.ly/3DnGFTQ

***5:30 p.m. - Press Availability*** Interested credentialed media should e-mail an RSVP to region4press@epa.gov. Please include your name, media affiliation and contact information.

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EPA proposes revisions to Federal Air Rules for Reservations, seeks public comment

EPA Air - Fri, 10/14/2022 - 19:00

Seattle (Oct. 14, 2022) – The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency proposes revisions to the Federal Air Rules for Reservations and is soliciting public comments until Jan. 10, 2023. 

Full details on the proposed changes and comment submission instructions are available on the EPA FARR website.  

Created in 2005, the FARR are a set of basic air quality regulations established under the Clean Air Act that applies to 39 Indian reservations in Idaho, Oregon and Washington. The FARR is unique to EPA Region 10 and provides important tools for EPA and Tribes to effectively manage activities that cause air pollution.  

The proposed revisions clarify aspects of the rules, improve implementation, incorporate recent air quality improvement strategies and extend the FARR to three new reservation lands. 

One of the proposed revisions limits future installations of residential wood burning devices to only those certified by the EPA. This also limits burning materials to untreated wood and solid fuels designed specifically for these devices, like wood pellets and dry wood.  

Another rule EPA proposes only applies to the Colville, Nez Perce and Yakama Reservations, and establishes a curtailment program for residential wood burning devices. A curtailment program restricts the use of wood burning devices during periods of poor air quality. 

EPA also proposes extending the FARR to the Snoqualmie Indian Reservation, the Cowlitz Indian Reservation and the lands held in trust for the Samish Indian Nation, none of which had reservation lands in 2005. The proposed revisions would also clarify that the FARR applies to all lands held in trust for a Tribe in Idaho, Oregon and Washington that have not been formally designated as a reservation. 

The public can request a virtual meeting to discuss the FARR revisions by contacting Sandra Brozusky at brozusky.sandra@epa.gov before Oct. 27.  

EPA Issues Air Quality Advisory for Western Oregon Reservations

EPA Air - Fri, 10/14/2022 - 19:00

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Region 10, has issued an air quality advisory for Indian Reservations in Western Oregon due to the elevated pollution levels caused by regional wildfires. Weather forecasts indicate periods of poor air quality will continue through Monday.

Reservations included in the advisory are the Siletz, Grande Ronde, Coquille and Coos, Lower Umpqua and Siuslaw Reservations.

To check current air quality conditions go to https://fire.airnow.gov/. People who are at greater risk from the effects of smoke include those with heart disease or lung disease, older adults, children, and pregnant people. These sensitive groups should avoid outdoor exertion and minimize exposure to smoke as much as possible.  

As pollution levels increase, the EPA recommends that all residents restrict activity and use N95 masks. To keep levels of smoke as low as possible indoors, create a clean room. For more safety tips visit https://www.airnow.gov/wildfires/when-smoke-is-in-the-air/.

Air pollution can harm health and may have lasting effects. To protect vulnerable people, EPA requests that reservation residents reduce all sources of air pollution, such as automobile exhaust, as much as possible.

EPA scientists use weather forecasts, satellite pictures, fire incident reports, and air quality models to forecast air quality for tribal communities.  

For current advisory status on tribal lands, please call the EPA FARR Hotline at 1-800-424-4372, or visit  

https://www.epa.gov/farr/burn-bans-indian-reservations-id-or-and-wa#current-bans.

For burning restrictions in areas outside reservation boundaries, please contact your local clean air agency or fire department.

For smoke and fire information in Oregon visit https://oregonsmoke.blogspot.com/.

EPA Issues Air Quality Advisory for Western Washington Reservations

EPA Air - Fri, 10/14/2022 - 19:00

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Region 10, has issued an air quality advisory for Indian Reservations in Western Washington due to the elevated pollution levels caused by wildfires in the Cascade Mountains. Weather forecasts indicate periods of poor air quality will continue through Monday.

Reservations included in the advisory are the S’Klallam, Suquamish, Nisqually, Chehalis, Shoalwater Bay, Squaxin, Skokomish, Snoqualmie, Puyallup, Muckleshoot, Tulalip, Stillaguamish, Sauk-Suiattle, Nooksack, Upper Skagit, and Lummi Reservations.

To check current air quality conditions go to https://fire.airnow.gov/. People who are at greater risk from the effects of smoke include those with heart disease or lung disease, older adults, children, and pregnant people. These sensitive groups should avoid outdoor exertion and minimize exposure to smoke as much as possible.  

As pollution levels increase, the EPA recommends that all residents restrict activity and use N95 masks. To keep levels of smoke as low as possible indoors, create a clean room. For more safety tips visit https://www.airnow.gov/wildfires/when-smoke-is-in-the-air/.

Air pollution can harm health and may have lasting effects. To protect vulnerable people, EPA requests that reservation residents reduce all sources of air pollution, such as automobile exhaust, as much as possible.

EPA scientists use weather forecasts, satellite pictures, fire incident reports, and air quality models to forecast air quality for tribal communities.  

For current advisory status on tribal lands, please call the EPA FARR Hotline at 1-800-424-4372, or visit  

https://www.epa.gov/farr/burn-bans-indian-reservations-id-or-and-wa#current-bans.

For burning restrictions in areas outside reservation boundaries, please contact your local clean air agency or fire department.

For smoke and fire information in Washington visit

https://enviwa.ecology.wa.gov/home/text/426#BurnBans.

     

EPA Issues Air Quality Advisory for Kootenai Reservation

EPA Air - Fri, 10/14/2022 - 19:00

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Region 10, has issued an air quality advisory for the Kootenai Reservation in Idaho due to the elevated pollution levels caused by area wildfires. Forecasts indicate periods of poor air quality will continue through Monday.

To check current air quality conditions go to https://fire.airnow.gov/. People who are at greater risk from the effects of smoke include those with heart disease or lung disease, older adults, children, and pregnant people. These sensitive groups should avoid outdoor exertion and minimize exposure to smoke as much as possible.  

As pollution levels increase, the EPA recommends that all residents restrict activity and use N95 masks. To keep levels of smoke as low as possible indoors, create a clean room. For more safety tips visit https://www.airnow.gov/wildfires/when-smoke-is-in-the-air/

Air pollution can harm health and may have lasting effects. To protect vulnerable people, EPA requests that reservation residents reduce all sources of air pollution, such as automobile exhaust, as much as possible.

EPA scientists use weather forecasts, satellite pictures, fire incident reports, and air quality models to forecast air quality for tribal communities.

For current advisory status on tribal lands, please call the EPA FARR Hotline at 1-800-424-4372, or visit  

https://www.epa.gov/farr/burn-bans-indian-reservations-id-or-and-wa#current-bans.

For burning restrictions in areas outside reservation boundaries, please contact your local clean air agency or fire department.

For smoke and fire information in Idaho visit http://idsmoke.blogspot.com/.

Biden-Harris Administration and EPA Announce Delivery of Historic Water Infrastructure Funding from the Bipartisan Infrastructure Law to Michigan

EPA Air - Fri, 10/14/2022 - 19:00

CHICAGO (October 14, 2022) — Today, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency announced more than $212 million in Bipartisan Infrastructure Law funding to the state of Michigan for water infrastructure improvements.

President Biden’s Bipartisan Infrastructure Law allocates more than $50 billion to EPA toward repairing the nation’s essential water infrastructure, in turn helping communities access clean, safe, and reliable drinking water, prevent flooding, collect and treat wastewater to protect public health, and safeguard vital waterways.  

Regional Administrator Debra Shore joined White House Infrastructure Coordinator Mitch Landrieu, Congressman Dan Kildee, Michigan Department of Environment, Great Lakes and Energy (EGLE) Director Liesl Clark, and local officials at the Saginaw Water Treatment Plant to announce the funding.

"President Biden has been clear—we cannot leave any community behind as we rebuild America's infrastructure with the Bipartisan Infrastructure Law," said White House Infrastructure Coordinator Mitch Landrieu. "Because of his Bipartisan Infrastructure Law, nearly half of the additional SRF funding will now be grants or forgivable loans, making accessing these critical water resources easier for small, rural and disadvantaged communities."

“The historic investment from the Bipartisan Infrastructure Law is accelerating critical infrastructure upgrades in communities, especially those overburdened by water challenges,” said EPA Regional Administrator Debra Shore. "EPA is proud to partner with Michigan to maximize the benefits of these resources – including modernized infrastructure, lead service line replacement, and increased resiliency to climate impacts – in communities where they’re most needed.”

“In the richest country in the world, access to safe, affordable and reliable drinking water should be a right,” said Congressman Dan Kildee. “The Bipartisan Infrastructure Law is delivering for mid-Michigan by improving our water infrastructure, ensuring access to clean drinking water and creating thousands of good-paying union jobs. In Congress, I will continue working to bring federal resources home to mid-Michigan.”

“These projects and others like them throughout our state will help provide protections for the environment and for the 10 million Michiganders who rely on the Great Lakes system for drinking water,” said Michigan EGLE Director Liesl Clark. “It is incredibly exciting to see real progress made on modernizing water systems – particularly those that have deteriorated from decades of disinvestment.”

“The City of Saginaw is dedicated to providing safe, clean, reliable, drinking water to city residents, as well as to our 20 wholesale customer communities located in Saginaw County and portions of Bay and Tuscola Counties,” said Saginaw City Manager Tim Morales. “Our system is benefiting from federal investment and we are pleased that the infrastructure dollars announced today will support other projects throughout Michigan for years to come, greatly improving the reliability and integrity of our state’s water supply systems.”

Michigan has been awarded more than $212 million in capitalization grants from the Bipartisan Infrastructure Law through its State Revolving Funds (SRFs) program. These grants supplement nearly $67 million in regular FY22 funding to Michigan’s SRFs program.

EPA's SRFs are part of President Biden's Justice40 initiative, which aims to deliver at least 40% of the benefits from certain federal programs flow to underserved communities. Furthermore, nearly half the funding available through the SRFs thanks to the Bipartisan Infrastructure Law must be grants or principal forgiveness loans that remove barriers to investing in essential water infrastructure in underserved communities across America.

Michigan has submitted and obtained EPA’s approval of their plans for use of the FY22 funding announced today. Capitalization grants will continue to be awarded, on a rolling, state-by-state basis, as more states submit applications; states will also receive awards over the course of the next four years. Once grants are awarded, state programs will begin to deliver the funds as grants and loans to communities across their state.

The Bipartisan Infrastructure Law presents the largest-ever funding opportunity for investing in water infrastructure. Find out more about Bipartisan Infrastructure Law programs and other programs that help communities manage their water resources on EPA's Bipartisan Infrastructure Law page.

Final Cleanup Plan for Operable Unit 2 at Kerr-McGee Navassa Superfund Site to be Discussed at Community Meeting and Drop-In Information Session, October 18

EPA Air - Fri, 10/14/2022 - 19:00

NAVASSA, N.C. (October 14, 2022) – The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the North Carolina Department of Environmental Quality (NCDEQ) and the Multistate Trust will hold a community meeting and drop-in information session on Tuesday, October 18 to discuss the Record of Decision (ROD) and final cleanup plan that EPA recently issued for Operable Unit 2 (OU2) at the Kerr-McGee Chemical Corp – Navassa Superfund Site (the Site).

The OU2 ROD that EPA signed on September 28, 2022 is linked here. OU2 is the 15.6-acre area south of OU1 and north of the historical wood treating operations process area. OU2 was used for treated and untreated wood storage by Kerr-McGee and its predecessors. EPA selected Alternative 3 (Removal, On-site Reuse/Consolidation, and Off-site Disposal) as the final remedy for OU2 based in part on community input, including environmental justice considerations. The ROD presents a re-evaluation of Alternative 2 (Removal and Off-site Disposal) and Alternative 3 against the nine criteria per the National Oil and Hazardous Substances Pollution Contingency Plan (NCP). The decisive criteria that led to the selection of Alternative 3 over Alternative 2 were Alternative 3’s short-term effectiveness, implementability, and cost effectiveness. In addition, both the State of North Carolina and community stakeholders expressed a preference for Alternative 3.

Other meeting topics will include the upcoming sampling in the marsh, Site marketing and future use, and the Moze Heritage Center land donation.

Both the community meeting and drop-in information session will be held at the Navassa Community Center at 338 Main Street. The meeting can also be joined by Zoom or phone. See the flyer attached and linked here for more information. 

What:

Tuesday, October 18, 2022

  • Community Meeting: 6 p.m. – 7 p.m. In person and virtual.
  • Drop-in Information Session: 7 p.m. – 8 p.m. In person only.

Where:

Navassa Community Center, 338 Main Street, Navassa, NC

Join the meeting online:

Join the meeting by phone:

  • Call (301) 715-8592. Use meeting ID 946 584 8922# and passcode 664564#.

***MEDIA AVAILABILITY RSVP***: A media availability session will be held from 5 – 5:30 p.m. Interested credentialed media should e-mail an RSVP to region4press@epa.gov. Please include your name, media affiliation and contact information.

For More Information:

Site Background:

From 1936 to 1974, Kerr-McGee and its predecessors operated a creosote-based wood treating facility on approximately 70 acres of the ±246-acre former Kerr-McGee property on the Brunswick River at Sturgeon Creek. In 1980, Kerr-McGee decommissioned and dismantled the wood-treatment buildings and facilities.

In 2010, groundwater, soil, and sediment contamination by creosote-related chemicals led EPA to add the former Kerr-McGee property to the National Priorities List of federal Superfund sites. Site contamination does not currently threaten people living or working near the Superfund Site.

In 2005, the former Kerr-McGee property was conveyed to Tronox, a Kerr-McGee spinoff that filed for bankruptcy protection in 2009. In 2011, the Multistate Environmental Response Trust (the Multistate Trust) acquired approximately 152 acres of the former Kerr-McGee property as a court-appointed trustee as part of the Tronox bankruptcy settlement. In 2016, the Multistate Trust purchased an additional two acres.

The Multistate Trust is working with its beneficiaries—EPA and NCDEQ—on Site investigation, remediation and facilitating safe, beneficial future reuse of the ±100-acre Superfund Site. In April 2021, EPA issued a Record of Decision explaining that the selected remedy for the 20.2-acre OU1 is no action. The deletion of OU1 from EPA’s National Priorities List in September 2021 cleared the way for OU1’s future return to productive reuse.

Greenfield Environmental Multistate Trust LLC is trustee of the Multistate Trust.

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EPA to Host Four Lead Awareness Sessions in St. Louis to Reduce Childhood Lead Exposure

EPA Air - Thu, 10/13/2022 - 19:00

LENEXA, KAN. (OCT. 13, 2022) – The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) will host four lead awareness training sessions in St. Louis in October and November to reduce childhood lead exposure.

The Enhancing Lead-Safe Work Practices through Education and Outreach (ELSWPEO) program comes as EPA celebrates Children’s Health Month and prepares for National Lead Poisoning Prevention Week Oct. 23-29.

EPA is hosting four free sessions in St. Louis:
  • Lead Awareness Curriculum Train-the-Trainer to learn how to use and modify the Lead Awareness Curriculum to teach your community about lead:
    • Tuesday, Oct. 18, 10 a.m. to 1:30 p.m.
    • Neighborhood Innovation Center, 3207 Meramec Street, St. Louis, MO 63118
    • Register online​​​​​​​
  • Understanding Lead to learn about lead, its impacts, and actions you can take to prevent lead exposure and lead poisoning:
  • Training for Contractors focused on Renovation, Repair and Painting (RRP) firms working on pre-1978 homes to become lead-safe certified under EPA’s RRP rule:
    • Monday, Nov. 7, 8 a.m. to 4 p.m.
    • Courtyard by Marriott, 823-827 Washington Ave, St. Louis, MO 63101
    • Register online
    • Tuesday, Nov. 8, 8 a.m. to 4 p.m.
    • Courtyard by Marriott, 823-827 Washington Ave, St. Louis, MO 63101
    • Register online

“This initiative demonstrates how collaboration between national, state, local, and tribal governments and organizations can protect underserved communities from exposure to toxic chemicals like lead,” said Michal Freedhoff, assistant administrator for EPA’s Office of Chemical Safety and Pollution Prevention. “Many communities across the U.S. are still at risk for lead exposure, and we are committed to lowering and preventing it.”

During ELSWPEO outreach to 11 communities in 2021, this EPA initiative certified 282 contractors in lead-safe work practices and educated 245 community leaders and 170 community members with information about childhood lead exposure.

Building on this success, EPA is working with numerous partners to implement ELSWPEO for its second year, as part of its activities for National Lead Poisoning Prevention Week.

Learn more about ELSWPEO, RRP training dates and locations, and Lead Awareness Curriculum sessions.

Information on ELSWPEO in Spanish.

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Learn more about EPA Region 7

View all Region 7 news releases

Connect with EPA Region 7 on Facebook

Follow us on Twitter: @EPARegion7​​​​​​

EPA Selects Recipients of More Than $9 Million in Pollution Prevention Grants

EPA Air - Thu, 10/13/2022 - 19:00

WASHINGTON – Today, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) announced the selection of 32 recipients across the country that will receive over $9 million in pollution prevention (P2) grants made possible by recurring appropriation to EPA’s P2 program. These grants will allow states and Tribes to provide businesses with technical assistance to prevent or reduce pollution before it is even created, while also reducing costs.

The grants announced today are in addition to $12 million in P2 grants that were announced in September and made possible by President Biden’s Bipartisan Infrastructure Law’s historic $100 million program investment in EPA’s P2 program.

“For more than 30 years, EPA’s P2 grants have helped businesses implement best practices to reduce dangerous pollution in communities, including those that are overburdened and vulnerable,” said EPA Office of Chemical Safety and Pollution Prevention Deputy Assistant Administrator for Pollution Prevention Jennie Romer. “Preventing pollution before it starts is an important step in our work to deliver on President Biden’s ambitious environmental agenda, tackle the climate crisis and advance environmental justice.”

Many proposed projects center on communities with environmental justice concerns including one in Louisiana that will provide technical assistance to chemical, metal, and food and beverage manufacturers in overburdened communities between Baton Rouge and New Orleans. A project in Rhode Island will use the EPA P2 Environmental Justice (EJ) Facility Mapping Tool to target technical assistance to metal manufacturers and fabricators in disadvantaged communities to reduce pollutants and wastewater discharges. In California, the Yurok Tribe will produce a case study on controlling invasive weeds on their ancestral lands without using herbicides.

The grants announced today, as well as P2 grants funded under the Bipartisan Infrastructure Law also deliver on the President’s Justice40 initiative, which aims to deliver 40 percent of the overall benefits of climate, clean energy, affordable and sustainable housing, clean water, and other investments to disadvantaged communities. EPA anticipates the majority of grants will successfully direct at least 40% of their environmental and human health benefits onto disadvantaged communities that are marginalized, underserved, and overburdened by pollution.

The United States produces billions of pounds of pollution each year and spends billions of dollars per year controlling this pollution. Preventing pollution at the source, also known as P2 or source reduction, rather than managing waste after it is produced is an important part of advancing a sustainable economic and environmental infrastructure. P2 can lessen exposure to toxic chemicals, conserve natural resources, and reduce financial costs for businesses, particularly costs associated with waste management, disposal and cleanup. These practices are essential for protecting health, improving environmental conditions in and around disadvantaged communities, and preserving natural resources like wetlands, groundwater sources, and other critical ecosystems.

Selected grantees will, if awarded, document and share P2 best practices that they identify and develop through these grants, so that others can replicate these practices and outcomes. Each selected grantee will address at least one of six National Emphasis Areas (NEAs), which were established to focus resources to achieve measurable results and to create opportunities to share information among P2 grantees and businesses affiliated with similar NEAs. Each selected grantee will also develop at least one case study during the grant period on P2 practices that are new or not widely known or adopted, or where detailed information on the P2 practices could benefit other businesses or P2 technical assistance providers.

EPA anticipates that it will award the grants once all legal and administrative requirements are satisfied. Grants supported will be incrementally funded at the time grants are awarded.

A full list of the entities selected to receive funding can be found below.

Read more about P2 and the P2 Grant Programs.

List of Grantees

California: Yurok Tribe

Colorado: Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment

Connecticut: Connecticut Department of Energy and Environmental Protection

Delaware: University of Delaware

Idaho: Idaho Department of Environmental Quality

Illinois: University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign

Illinois: University of Illinois, Chicago

Iowa: Iowa Department of Natural Resources

Kansas: Kansas State University

Kentucky: Kentucky Department for Environmental Protection

Louisiana: Louisiana State University

Maryland: Maryland Department of the Environment

Massachusetts: University of Massachusetts, Amherst

Minnesota: Minnesota Pollution Control Agency

Montana: Montana State University

Nebraska: University of Nebraska, Lincoln

Nevada: Western Nevada College

New Hampshire: New Hampshire Department of Environmental Services

New Jersey: New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection

New Jersey: New Jersey Institute of Technology

New Jersey: Rowan University

North Carolina: East Carolina University

North Carolina: North Carolina Department of Environmental Quality

Oregon: Oregon Department of Environmental Quality

Pennsylvania: Pennsylvania State University

Rhode Island: Rhode Island Department of Environmental Management

Tennessee: Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation

Texas: University of Texas, at Arlington

Virginia: Virginia Department of Environmental Quality

Washington: Washington State Department of Ecology

Washington, D.C.: DC Department of Energy and Environment

West Virginia: West Virginia University

EPA Fines Midwest Motors in Eureka, Missouri, for Alleged Automobile ‘Defeat Device’ Violations

EPA Air - Thu, 10/13/2022 - 19:00

LENEXA, KAN. (OCT. 13, 2022) – Auto dealership and repair shop Midwest Motors of Eureka, Missouri, will pay a $15,000 civil penalty for allegedly tampering with car engines to render emissions controls inoperative in violation of the federal Clean Air Act.

According to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), Kociela Enterprises Inc., doing business as Midwest Motors, sold or installed so-called “defeat devices” on at least 21 occasions.

“Illegally tampering with auto emissions controls creates harmful air pollution and is a violation of federal law,” said David Cozad, director of the EPA Region 7’s Enforcement and Compliance Assurance Division. “EPA will hold accountable individuals and companies who manufacture, sell, and install defeat devices.”

In addition to paying the civil penalty, Midwest Motors certified that it would not sell or install defeat devices in the future.

Tampering of car engines, including installation of aftermarket defeat devices intended to bypass manufacturer emissions controls, results in significantly higher releases of nitrogen oxides and particulate matter, both of which contribute to serious public health problems in the United States. These problems include premature mortality, aggravation of respiratory and cardiovascular disease, aggravation of existing asthma, acute respiratory symptoms, chronic bronchitis, and decreased lung function. Numerous studies also link diesel exhaust to increased incidence of lung cancer.

Stopping aftermarket defeat devices for vehicles and engines is a top priority for EPA. The Agency identified this goal as one of seven National Compliance Initiatives in 2019. Learn more on EPA’s website.

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Learn more about EPA Region 7

View all Region 7 news releases

Connect with EPA Region 7 on Facebook: www.facebook.com/eparegion7

Follow us on Twitter: @EPARegion7​​​​​​

EPA to Hold Open House Meeting in Ardmore, Oklahoma on Health Risks from Ethylene Oxide Emissions

EPA Air - Thu, 10/13/2022 - 19:00

DALLAS, TEXAS (October 13, 2022) – The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency is committed to reducing health risks associated with toxic air pollution and is working to update and strengthen Clean Air Act standards for commercial sterilizers to achieve that goal. As part of that process, EPA is conducting an open house meeting with the community of Ardmore, Oklahoma.

The open house will provide an opportunity for individuals to talk one-on-one with staff from EPA about EtO emissions and risk information impacting Ardmore residents. EPA aims to improve public understanding of the risk; help the community and the industry reduce risk from EtO in the near-term; and hear input as EPA continues to develop regulations to reduce air pollution from commercial sterilizers.   

The upcoming meeting for Ardmore will be held on: 

  • October 18, 2022
  • Ardmore Public Library (Smith Room) 320 E. St. NW Ardmore, Oklahoma 73401
  • From 4:00 pm to 7:00 pm

For registration and more detailed information please visit our webpage or contact us at eto@epa.gov


Connect with the Environmental Protection Agency Region 6 on Facebook, Twitter, or visit our homepage.

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EPA Highlights $650,000 Brownfields Investment in Vernon

EPA Air - Thu, 10/13/2022 - 19:00

VERNON, CONN. (Oct. 13, 2022) – Today, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) New England Regional Administrator David W. Cash, along with Senator Richard Blumenthal, Congressman Joe Courtney, the Connecticut Department of Energy and Environmental Protection (CT DEEP), and Mayor Daniel A. Champagne highlighted the $650,000 investment in Vernon, part of a greatly increased Brownfields investment in New England this year made possible by the Bipartisan Infrastructure Law to revitalize communities across the country by cleaning up contaminated and blighted sites and redeveloping them for productive uses.

"Thanks to the Bipartisan Infrastructure Law and President Biden's leadership, EPA's Brownfields program is making a record investment throughout New England this year," said EPA New England Regional Administrator David W. Cash. "EPA has worked on a number of mill sites in Vernon in the past, as we look forward to helping the town revitalize the Daniels Mill. Today's investment of EPA Brownfields cleanup funding will jump start economic redevelopment and job creation in the community as we work to turn environmental risks into economic assets, especially in those communities with a history and legacy of being overburdened by pollution."

The Town of Vernon will receive a site-specific cleanup grant of $650,000 for the Daniels Mill at 98 East Main Street in Vernon.

EPA's Brownfields cleanup grants provide funding to carry out cleanup activities at a specific site owned by the recipient. Through these grants, EPA readies sites for redevelopment, leveraging jobs and other investment in the process as the sites get revitalized.

Brownfields sites often lie in proximity to overburdened and vulnerable communities where people live, work, play, and pray. These funds serve to support underserved and economically disadvantaged communities in assessing and cleaning up abandoned industrial and commercial properties and are part of a historic national EPA investment in Brownfields remediation. Brownfields funding helps begin to address the economic, social, and environmental challenges that have burdened these communities for far too long.

The new Brownfields funding announced this year includes approximately $180 million from the historic $1.5 billion investment from the Bipartisan Infrastructure Law to help turn brownfield sites across the nation into hubs of economic growth and job creation, along with more than $75 million from appropriated funds.

"This critical federal funding is a major investment in Vernon that will create jobs and help transform polluted land into economically viable and environmentally safe parcels that communities will use for years to come. These much-needed awards assist our communities in protecting the health of residents, incentivizing economic growth and development, and improving the quality of life for all. I am proud to support this grant and will continue fighting for future funds for Connecticut," said U.S. Senator Richard Blumenthal.

"The EPA's investment in Brownfields in Vernon will have a major impact on the local economy and help transform these abandoned sites into new businesses, housing, and more. This grant is yet another example of how funding from the Bipartisan Infrastructure Law is making a big difference in our communities," said U.S. Senator Chris Murphy.

"Today's EPA announcement at Daniel's Mill in the Rockville section of Vernon that $650,000 in federal funds will be released for site cleanup is a breakthrough moment for this historic section of town," said U.S. Congressman Joe Courtney. "This grant is the direct result of last November's passage of the Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act, which turbocharged EPA with five years of consistent robust funding. Now, projects like Daniels Mill that have been languishing for years have suddenly been moved up on EPA's list with IIJA. As a resident of Vernon who lived in Rockville for many years, I am particularly excited to see this building renovated because, like so much of Rockville, 'it's bones are good'!"

"DEEP greatly appreciates EPA's continuing commitment to brownfields redevelopment in Connecticut," said Connecticut Department of Energy & Environmental Protection Commissioner Katie Dykes. "DEEP is proud to continue to partner with EPA, and with cities, towns, and with non-profit and for-profit developers to facilitate cleanup and redevelopment of brownfields in large and small communities across our state. Thank you to the Biden Administration and to our Congressional delegation for helping to secure this significant funding for our state, and congratulations to the Town of Vernon. We look forward to witnessing the transformation of the Daniels Mill site into a safe, productive community asset."

"This grant from EPA to help cover cleanup costs at Daniel's Mill is an important step toward our goal of restoring the gateway to Rockville, developing housing and commercial space and getting this historic property back on the tax rolls," said Vernon Mayor Daniel A. Champagne. "This is a wonderful example of local, state and federal government working together to move a community forward. We have been putting the pieces together for what will be a transformational project for downtown Vernon. This is a spectacular complex with interesting architecture, waterfalls and the Hockanum River flowing through. Every grant we obtain moves Vernon, our region and Connecticut closer to our goal."

EPA's Brownfields grants and assistance to Vernon this year is among other significant annual investments by EPA to help New England communities to address brownfield properties. Across the six New England states this year, EPA will be awarding over $51 million to assess or clean contaminated Brownfields sites in 42 communities.

In New England, since the beginning of the Brownfields program, EPA has awarded $125 million in assessment grant funding, $122 million in revolving loan fund grants and supplemental funding and $87 million in cleanup grant funding, totaling $334 million. These grant funds have paved the way for more than $4 billion in public and private cleanup and redevelopment investment and for over 23,000 jobs in assessment, cleanup, construction and redevelopment.

Background

A brownfield is a property for which the expansion, redevelopment, or reuse may be complicated by the presence or potential presence of a hazardous substance, pollutant, or contaminant.

Redevelopment made possible through the program includes everything from grocery stores and affordable housing to health centers, museums, greenways, and solar farms.

The Brownfields Program delivers on the Biden Administration's Justive40 initiative, which states that at least 40 percent of the benefits of certain government programs flow to disadvantaged communities. EPA is committed to meeting and exceeding this goal.

This funding helps communities begin to address the economic, social, and environmental challenges caused by brownfields by stimulating economic opportunity and environmental revitalization in historically overburdened communities.

More information

Brownfields in New England

For more on Brownfields Grants

For more on EPA's Brownfields Program

وكالة حماية البيئة تعلن عن فرص لمساهمات الجمهور بشأن العدالة البيئية المرتبطة بتحسينات لائحة الرصاص والنحاس

EPA Air - Wed, 10/12/2022 - 19:00

واشنطن (12 أكتوبر 2022) – سوف تستضيف وكالة حماية البيئة الأمريكية اجتماعين افتراضيين لعامة الجمهور بهدف مناقشة والتماس مساهماتهم بشأن اعتبارات العدالة البيئية المرتبطة بتطوير مقترح تحسينات لائحة الرصاص والنحاس. وستتيح الجلستان فرصًا لوكالة حماية البيئة من أجل تبادل المعلومات بشأن إعداد تحسينات لائحة الرصاص والنحاس، كما ستمكّن الأفراد من تقديم مساهماتهم بشأن اعتبارات العدالة البيئية المرتبطة باللائحة.

وفي هذا الصدد، تقول راديكا فوكس مساعد برنامج وكالة حماية البيئة لشؤون المياه: "يُعدّ عملنا على إشراك المجتمعات المهمشة المتضررة من عنصر الرصاص أمرًا بالغ الأهمية لضمان التزام مقترح تحسينات لائحة الرصاص والنحاس بالعدالة البيئية. وتلك خطوة هامة تجاة تطوير تحسينات اللائحة واستبدال جميع خطوط خدمات الرصاص للالتزام بـخطة عمل الطلاء والأنابيب المحتوية على الرصاص التي اعتمدتها إدارة بايدن-هاريس".

تلتزم وكالة حماية البيئة بحماية العائلات والمجتمعات من الرصاص الملوث لمياه الشرب. وفي إطار عملية إعداد تحسينات لائحة الرصاص والنحاس، تدرس وكالة حماية البيئة إعطاء الأولوية للمجتمعات المحرومة والمثقلة بالأعباء. تهدف الوكالة إلى عرض مقترح تحسينات لائحة الرصاص والنحاس للحصول على تعليقات الجمهور في عام 2023 واتخاذ قرار نهائي بحلول 16 أكتوبر 2024. ويُعدّ الحصول على مساهمات الجمهور بشأن تطوير هذا المقترح أمرًا بالغ الأهمية لعملية تطوير اللائحة.

سيكون الاجتماعان المخصصان لعامة الجمهور متماثلين، وسيعقدان عبر الإنترنت فقط في 25 أكتوبر 2022 (1-4 مساءً بتوقيت المنطقة الشرقية) و1 نوفمبر 2022 (5-8 مساءً بتوقيت المنطقة الشرقية). ويمكن لأفراد المجتمع الراغبين في المشاركة بأحد الاجتماعين التسجيل هنا وسوف تتاح أيضًا فرصة لتسجيل التعليقات الصوتية. تشجع وكالة حماية البيئة عامة الجمهور على مشاركة أفكارهم بشأن استعمال أساليب منصفة لمعالجة مشاكل تلوث مياه الشرب بالرصاص في مجتمعاتهم.

وترحب وكالة حماية البيئة أيضًا بتلقي التعليقات المكتوبة عبر رقم تعريف المستند على الموقع الإلكتروني: http://www.regulations.gov/ رقم تعريف المستند: EPA-HQ-OW-2022-0801. حتى 15 نوفمبر 2022.

تهدف وكالة حماية البيئة إلى عرض مقترح تحسينات لائحة الرصاص والنحاس للحصول على تعليقات الجمهور في عام 2023 واتخاذ قرار نهائي بحلول 16 أكتوبر 2024. 

يأتي هذان الاجتماعان ضمن العديد من أنشطة إشراك واستشارة الجهات المعنية التي تنظمها وكالة حماية البيئة قبل تقديم مقترح تحسينات لائحة الرصاص والنحاس. وفي السياق ذاته، تجري وكالة حماية البيئة استشارات مع القبائل في 27 أكتوبر 2022 و9 نوفمبر 2022 (تعرّف على المزيد)، كما تعمل الوكالة أيضًا على استشارة الهيئة الاستشارية العملية التابعة للوكالة (SAB)، والمجلس الوطني الاستشاري لمياه الشرب (NDWAC)، وكيانات محلية وفيدرالية، وهيئة مراجعة دعم الأعمال الصغيرة (SBAR)، وذلك حسب الاقتضاء بموجب قانون مياه الشرب الآمنة والأنظمة الفيدرالية والأوامر التنفيذية.

تعرّف المزيد عن مياه الشرب الآمنة ومقترح تحسينات لائحة الرصاص والنحاس والمشاريع المرتبطة.

EPA 宣布就《铅铜改进条例》的环境正义公开征求公众意见

EPA Air - Wed, 10/12/2022 - 19:00

华盛顿(2022 10 12 日) – 美国国家环境保护局 (EPA) 将举办两场网络公开会议,针对提出的《铅铜改进条例》(LCRI) 的制定,探讨环境正义相关考量并征求公众意见。EPA 将通过这些会议分享即将开展的 LCRI 规则制定的相关信息,同时让个人提出与该条例相关的环境正义方面的意见。

EPA 水务署助理署长 Radhika Fox 说:“为确保在《铅铜改进条例》中确保环境正义,我们努力让受到铅污染负面影响的弱势社区参与进来,这一点至关重要。这是我们制定改进条例的重要一步,也是替换所有铅供水管道的必要步骤,还是拜登-哈里斯政府在‘含铅管道和油漆行动计划’中的承诺。”

EPA 致力于保护家庭和社区,让他们免受含铅饮用水的影响。在 LCRI 规则制定流程中,EPA 正在考虑优先保护历来服务欠佳并且负担过重的社区。EPA 计划在 2023 年提出 LCRI 并征求公众意见,并在 2024 年 10 月 16 日前做出最终决议。针对提出的 LCRI 的制定征求公众意见是条例制定流程的关键。

这两次公开会议的内容相同,仅以在线形式举行,时间是 2022 年 10 月 25 日(美国东部夏季时间下午 1-4 点)和 11 月 1 日(美国东部夏季时间下午 5-8 点)。感兴趣的公众可在此注册参加会议,并且有机会报名发表口头意见。EPA 鼓励公众就如何公平解决社区中含铅饮用水的问题分享见解。

EPA 也接受公众通过公开卷宗提交书面意见,网址:http://www.regulations.gov/,卷宗 ID:EPA-HQ-OW-2022-0801,截止日期:2022 年 11 月 15 日。

EPA 计划在 2023 年提出 LCRI 并征求公众意见,并在 2024 年 10 月 16 日前做出最终决议。 

环境正义公开会议是多项利益相关者参与活动与咨询场次之一,EPA 将在提出 LCRI 前开展。EPA 将在 2022 年 10 月 27 日和 11 月 9 日开展部落协商(了解详细信息)。按照《安全饮用水法》和其他联邦法规和行政命令的要求,EPA 还将与其科学顾问委员会 (SAB)、国家饮用水咨询委员会 (NDWAC)、联邦和地方实体以及小型企业宣传审查 (SBAR) 小组会议进行协商。

详细了解有关安全饮用水和即将进行的《铅铜改进条例》规则制定及相关公众参与活动的信息.

La EPA anuncia oportunidades para recibir opiniones del público sobre la justicia ambiental para mejorar las reglas de plomo y cobre

EPA Air - Wed, 10/12/2022 - 19:00

WASHINGTON (12 de octubre de 2022) – La Agencia de Protección Ambiental de Estados Unidos (EPA, por sus siglas en inglés) organizará dos reuniones públicas virtuales para discutir y solicitar comentarios sobre consideraciones de justicia ambiental relacionadas con desarrollar las propuestas Mejoras de las Reglas de Plomo y Cobre (LCRI, por sus siglas en inglés). Estas sesiones brindarán oportunidades para que la EPA comunique información sobre la próxima elaboración de reglas LCRI y para que las personas expresen su opinión sobre las consideraciones de justicia ambiental relacionadas con las reglas. 

“Nuestro trabajo destinado a involucrar a las comunidades desfavorecidas afectadas negativamente por el plomo es fundamental para garantizar la justicia ambiental dentro de las Mejoras de las Reglas de Plomo y Cobre”, señaló Radhika Fox, Subadministradora del Agua de la EPA. “Este es un paso importante hacia el desarrollo de nuestras mejoras en las reglas y hacia el reemplazo de todas las tuberías de servicio de plomo, un compromiso del Plan de Acción de Tuberías y Pinturas de Plomo de la Administración Biden-Harris”. 

La EPA se compromete a proteger a las familias y comunidades contra el plomo en el agua potable. Como parte del proceso de elaboración de normas de LCRI, la EPA está considerando priorizar las protecciones para las comunidades históricamente marginadas y sobrecargadas. La EPA tiene la intención de proponer LCRI para recibir comentarios públicos en 2023 y tomar medidas finales antes del 16 de octubre de 2024. Es crucial recibir comentarios del público sobre el desarrollo de LCRI propuestas para llevar a cabo el proceso de desarrollarlas. 

Las dos reuniones públicas serán idénticas y se efectuarán en un formato solo en línea el 25 de octubre (1-4 pm, hora local del Este) y el 1 de noviembre de 2022 (5-8 pm, hora local del Este). Los miembros del público interesados en participar en una reunión pueden registrarse aquí y también tendrán la oportunidad de inscribirse a fin de aportar comentarios verbales. La EPA alienta al público a comunicar ideas sobre cómo abordar equitativamente los problemas del plomo en el agua potable en sus comunidades. 

La EPA también está aceptando comentarios por escrito a través del expediente público en http://www.regulations.gov/, Número de identificación de expediente EPA-HQ-OW-2022-0801 hasta el 15 de noviembre de 2022. 

La EPA tiene la intención de proponer LCRI para comentarios públicos en 2023 y tomar medidas finales antes del 16 de octubre de 2024. 

Las reuniones públicas sobre justicia ambiental forman parte de varias actividades y consultas de participación de las partes interesadas en las que la EPA está participando antes de proponer LCRI. La EPA está llevando a cabo una Consulta Tribal el 27 de octubre y el 9 de noviembre de 2022 (más información). La EPA también está consultando con la Junta Asesora Científica (SAB) de la agencia, el Consejo Asesor Nacional de Agua Potable (NDWAC), entidades federales y locales, y un Panel de Evaluación de Defensoría de Pequeñas Empresas (SBAR) según lo exige la Ley de Agua Potable Segura y otras leyes federales y órdenes ejecutivas. 

Obtenga más información en inglés sobre el agua potable segura y las próximas mejoras de las reglas de plomo y cobre y los compromisos relacionados.

EPA, Navy, State of California, and City of Irvine celebrate facility reuse award winner Marine Corps Air Station El Toro

EPA Air - Wed, 10/12/2022 - 19:00

Today, representatives from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), U.S Navy, California Department of Toxic Substances Control, and the City of Irvine recognized the former Marine Corps Air Station El Toro as a winner in the EPA’s fifth annual National Federal Facility Excellence in Site Reuse Awards.

“Congratulations to the former Marine Corps Air Station El Toro for selection as a 2022 National Federal Facility Excellence in Site Reuse Award winner,” said Dr. Carlton Waterhouse, EPA’s Deputy Assistant Administrator for the Office of Land and Emergency Management. “These awards highlight the hard work and tremendous partnerships needed to address contaminated federal facilities and implement locally driven reuse strategies to safeguard communities and protect the environment.”

Judges for the Federal Facility Excellence in Site Reuse Award select from four categories of contaminated land at federal facilities: (1) Superfund sites; (2) Superfund Base Realignment and Closure (BRAC) sites; (3) non-Superfund BRAC sites; and (4) non-Superfund sites. EL Toro was chosen in the Superfund BRAC Award category.

“Cleaning up and returning this closed base to productive reuse has resulted in revitalization and renewed purpose for Irvine and Orange County and represents a model for federal, state, and local collaboration,” said Michael Montgomery, EPA Pacific Southwest Region Director of the Superfund and Emergency Management Division.

Former Marine Corps Air Station El Toro was decommissioned as an active base in 1999 under the Base Realignment and Closure (BRAC) Act. Extensive cleanup efforts have facilitated the transformation of approximately 1,300 acres of the former military base into the Great Park.

“The Great Park demonstrates what we can achieve when all levels of government work together,” said City of Irvine Mayor Farrah N. Khan. “As we continue working to bring even more amenities to the Great Park, we recognize that none of this would be possible without the collaboration and commitment of the agencies that have helped us restore this site.”

The Great Park is a recreational destination that includes parks and open space, hiking trails, multi-use sport facilities, an art complex, an amphitheater, a water park, and an ice rink. The City of Irvine is developing an overarching Great Park Framework Plan that includes a world-class botanic garden and veteran memorial park; a permanent live music amphitheater; and rehabilitating existing space to facilitate cultural uses including the Flying Leatherneck air and museum concept, the California Fire Museum, and a Children’s Museum.

EPA serves the public by supporting innovative, cost-effective cleanups at federal facilities and the return of those facilities to productive use. The agency assists in the transfer of properties and provides regulatory oversight at many types of Department of Defense sites, including BRAC sites. Because these facilities often encompass hundreds of acres with buildings, roads and other infrastructure, their effective and efficient cleanup and reuse can play a pivotal role in communities’ economic development.

Learn more about the 2022 National Federal Facility Excellence in Site Reuse Awards and cleanups at federal facilities.

Learn more about EPA’s Pacific Southwest Region. Connect with us on Facebook and on Twitter.

EPA awards Food Lifeline $200,000 for project to reduce methane, food waste in South Seattle

EPA Air - Wed, 10/12/2022 - 19:00

SEATTLE (October 12, 2022) - The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has awarded Food Lifeline of Seattle approximately $200,000 to assist in the development of a community-owned anaerobic digester in the South Park neighborhood of Seattle. 

Anaerobic digestion is a process in which microorganisms break down organic materials, such as food scraps, manure, and sewage sludge, in the absence of oxygen. The process produces digestate, a nutrient-rich product used for fertilizer, and captures the methane produced when organic materials decay. Rather than being released into the atmosphere as a potent greenhouse gas, the methane or “biogas” is captured in an anaerobic digester for energy production.

Food Lifeline will partner with Duwamish Valley Sustainability Association, Black Star Farmers, and Sustainable Seattle, to develop new anaerobic digester capacity for the South City Biodigester Collaboration project. This project is designed to be a demonstration of the potential for a larger scale biofuel system and serve as an example of a closed loop “circular economy.” It is also intended to help provide Black, Indigenous, and People of Color and low-income communities autonomy over their waste-to-energy cycle, reduce greenhouse gas emissions, and introduce immigrant, first-generation, and BIPOC youth in the Duwamish Valley to STEM career pathways. 

The demonstration project will measure specific AD deliverables, including pounds of waste diverted from landfills and large composting facilities, gallons of digestate used by Black Star Farmers in their local farms, amount of community participation and youth involvement, and number of education and engagement events held. Activities will be conducted by project partners will include: 

  • Duwamish Valley Sustainability Association: technical expertise, youth and community network engagement, workshops and community education events,  up to 200 hours of curriculum. 
  • Black Star Farmers:  technical expertise, a Black and Indigenous farmer network, use and demonstration of co-products, identification of other BIPOC farms in need of excess co-product, up to 200 hours of curriculum. 
  • Sustainable Seattle: program oversight through up to 100 hours of relationship and project management support, promotion of classes, distribution of project information to their network.

The goal of the EPA grant is to help reduce food loss and waste, and to divert food waste from landfills and incinerators by expanding anaerobic digester capacity. The grant is one of 11 projects selected for funding in 2022 which include feasibility studies, modeling efforts, demonstration projects, as well as technical assistance and training.

“Projects like this one underscore the benefits of a collaborative, community-centered approach,” said Casey Sixkiller, regional administrator of EPA’s Region 10 office in Seattle. “The EPA is excited to support this anaerobic digestion project and other efforts in the Duwamish Valley that bring people together to fight climate change, protect public health, and empower communities.”  

The South City Biodigester Collaboration project will be an initial exhibition of a new technology process for the South Park community, leveraging breakthrough technology that involves the AD process coupled with very low energy inputs making it more accessible for small scale businesses and organizations. The project will evaluate the cost effectiveness of inputs and output potentials for scalability in small business and community use, leverage its findings and impact to assess the technological feasibility and cost effectiveness of a larger scale biofuel system in the South Park community, and develop a local, community based, BIPOC led farm-to-table-back-to-farm lifecycle. 

For this year's grant competition, EPA evaluated applicants on how their projects addressed numerous factors resulting from industrial, governmental, commercial, and/or other actions: human health, environmental, social, climate-related, and other cumulative impacts, and accompanying economic challenges of such impacts. EPA prioritized environmental justice by ensuring nearly half of the $2 million awarded nationally under this grant program this year were to projects or recipients located in underserved communities. Specifically, EPA considered the effects of this program on People of Color, low-income, Tribal, and Indigenous populations, and other vulnerable populations, such as the elderly and children.

Background
EPA awarded a nationwide total of about $110,000 in 2019 and more than $3 million in 2020 in cooperative agreements under this program. The project types selected for funding include feasibility studies, demonstration projects, workshops, as well as technical assistance and training.

More information
Resources and Funding Opportunities Related to the Food System

EPA community meeting to present update on ethylene oxide risk in Sandy, Utah: October 20   

EPA Air - Wed, 10/12/2022 - 19:00

Sandy, Utah -- The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) will host a virtual community meeting on Thursday, October 20, at 6:30 p.m. to share information about health risks from the chemical ethylene oxide, or EtO, near the BD Medical sterilization facility at 9450 South State Street in Sandy, Utah. During the meeting, EPA will present information on lifetime risk levels for those who live in the immediate vicinity of the facility and will hear from community members and other stakeholders about their concerns. The agency will also provide a brief summary of control measures the facility is voluntarily installing to reduce EtO emissions by an estimated 90%. EPA will be joined by staff from the Utah Department of Environmental Quality and Utah Department of Health and Human Services. 

Meeting Details: 

Thursday, October 20, 2022; 6:30 p.m.  

Virtual Zoom meeting 

REGISTER HERE and learn more about the BD Medical facility.  

 EPA recently completed air quality modeling and risk assessments for sterilization facilities across the United States, including the BD Medical facility in Sandy.  EPA’s analysis indicates that the air near the facility does not exceed short-term health benchmarks. However, the modeling results indicate that a lifetime of exposure to EtO emissions could lead to long-term health impacts if risk levels are not reduced. EPA will present this information at the October 20 meeting.  In addition, the Utah Department of Environmental Quality is currently conducting an EPA-supported air quality monitoring study of EtO near the BD Medical facility and at other locations throughout the Salt Lake City area and will provide an update on the status of that study.

 The October 20 meeting is part of EPA’s ongoing efforts to reduce emissions of EtO from commercial sterilizers, including activities with state partners and facilities to evaluate concerns and take appropriate steps to reduce emissions. EPA joined Utah DEQ for a virtual community meeting for the Sandy community in August to provide air quality modeling results and is convening this meeting as an additional opportunity to share information and respond to questions. Specifically, EPA aims to improve public understanding of risk; help states, communities, and industry reduce risks from EtO in the near-term; and hear input as the agency continues to take steps to reduce air pollution. Later this year, EPA expects to propose an air pollution regulation to protect public health by addressing EtO emissions at commercial sterilizers. 

 For more detailed information visit EPA’s EtO website or contact us at eto@epa.gov.  

 Visit EPA’s BD Medical Sandy, Utah website

 

EPA Awards Three Environmental Merit Awards to Maine Recipients

EPA Air - Wed, 10/12/2022 - 19:00

BOSTON (Oct. 12, 2022) – Today, the U.S. EPA recognized two individuals and one organization in Maine at the virtual 2022 Environmental Merit Awards ceremony. The awardees were among 20 recipients across New England honored for contributing to improving New England's environment.

New England's annual Environmental Merit Awards are given to community leaders, scientists, government officials, business leaders, schools, and students who represent different approaches, but a common commitment to environmental protection.

"EPA is proud to recognize and congratulate Maine awardees', for their great accomplishments and their continued efforts towards combatting climate change, bringing cleaner air and water to neighborhoods, and ensuring our underserved communities' voices are being heard," said EPA New England Regional Administrator David W. Cash. "Their ingenuity and commitment truly make a difference in our New England communities."

The Environmental Merit Awards, which are given to people who have already taken action, are awarded in the categories of individual; business (including professional organizations); local, state or federal government; and environmental, community, academia or nonprofit organization. Also, each year EPA presents lifetime achievement awards for individuals. The 2022 Environmental Merit Award Winners from Maine listed by category are:

Ira Leighton "In Service to States" Award

Every year, one individual in New England is selected to receive the Ira Leighton "In Service to States" Environmental Merit Award. It is a tribute to our long-time colleague and friend, Ira Leighton, who passed away in 2013, after serving 41 years at the U.S. EPA. Ira's dedication and passion for protecting the environment was evident to all who knew him. He was a constant presence in New England, a force who took ideas and made them actionable tasks that resulted in measurable improvements. Today, the 2022 award was presented to Melanie Loyzim.

Melanie Loyzim
Maine Department of Environmental Protection

Melanie Loyzim, Commissioner of the Maine Department of Environmental Protection, has been a leader over the past two decades in promoting environmental protection and maintain­ing a viable economy.

Melanie spent most of her career at state agencies, beginning in Colorado. In 2006, she started in the Oil Enforcement Unit of the Bureau of Remediation and Waste Management at Maine's DEP. Since then, Melanie has risen from supervisor in the Air Bureau to director for the Bureau of Air Quality, then director for the Bureau of Remediation and Waste Management, and finally deputy commissioner, before becoming commissioner last year.

Melanie has supported staff efforts that contributed to a broader multi-state understanding of air pollution, with an emphasis on ground-level ozone and regional haze trends. These insights, for states from Virginia to Maine, provided a record of the success of regional air pollution con­trol programs, and inform future efforts for clean air progress.

Melanie also participated in the Northeast States for Coordinated Air Use Management, work­ing with air director colleagues to improve air quality regionally. This included efforts such as putting in place California low emissions vehicle standards in the states that adopted the pro­gram, including Maine. She continues to participate in regional air quality issues as an officer of the Ozone Transport Commission.

As director for the Bureau of Remediation and Waste Management, Melanie was a board director for the Northeast Waste Management Officials' Association, where she worked with colleagues in other nearby states on issues relating to hazardous waste, petroleum and other cleanup sites, brownfields, materials management, product stewardship, pollution prevention, emerging contaminants, and toxics in products.

Under Melanie's leadership, Maine is embarking on a PFAS soil and water investigation result­ing from applying biosolids. This massive effort is leading the nation to better understand the links between PFAS, application of biosolids, and impacts to agriculture.

Melanie deserves this award thanks to her leadership in multiple program areas, and her think­ing of practical solutions that help people, the economy, and the environment.

Lifetime Achievement

Ed Bassett
Passamaquoddy Tribe – Pleasant Point in Perry

Ed Bassett of the Passamaquoddy Tribe retired from his job as multimedia specialist for the Passamaquoddy Tribe at Pleasant Point in December, leaving behind a legacy of environmental protection, restoration and stewardship.

Over 40 years, Ed has served in leadership roles for his Tribe, including Tribal vice chief, Tribal Council member, Tribal game warden, Tribal cultural program director, and Tribal fish and game committee member.

He helped build the capacity of the Tribe's Environmental Program through his management of its General Assistance program for 20 years. Ed advanced environmental protection on Passamaquoddy territory through restoration of tribal lands and waters, with a focus of improving water quality and removing barriers to restoring tribal cultural aquatic species.

Ed's expertise in communications helped advance the Tribe's restoration efforts. Through his expertise in digital media technology, he communicated critical environmental issues facing the tribe.

Ed has also devoted significant time to mentoring younger staff and youth. He was director of the Tribe's Camp Waponahki Youth Program, helped with the Wabanaki Wilderness Program, and was assistant director of the Tribal Vocational Education Program. He is also a traditional Passamaquoddy birch back canoe builder, knowledge he passed on.

Perhaps Ed's most lasting achievement was co-founding the Schoodic Riverkeepers, with its mission to improve public perceptions of the Indigenous perspective. With a focus on restoring the Schoodic River watershed, the Passamaquoddy name for the St. Croix River, Ed played a crucial role in educating the tribal community and public on the importance of alewife restoration. This led to the opening of the alewife passage at Grand Falls Dam during the spawning season.

Despite retirement, Ed continues to serve by developing a safe public watering point for the Tribal community, eliminating the need to travel for drinking water. Ed's lifelong investment in environmental leadership and cultural preservation will have a lasting impact on Passamaquoddy tribal members.

Environmental, Community, Academia, Nonprofit

Mark King, Maine Department of Environmental Protection and
Mark Hutchinson, University of Maine Cooperation Extension
Maine Compost School, Augusta

The Maine Compost School, the longest continuously running compost program in the country, in 1997 began to tackle the need to divert food waste from landfills. Based at Highmoor Farm, a University of Maine Forest and Experimental Station in Monmouth, it hosts a commercial compost site where students get hands-on learning and field experiences along with traditional classroom activities. Students at the five-day school are from businesses as well as non-profits and government agencies, or are homeowners. More than 700 participants have come from the US, Canada and 42 other countries.

Generally, by diverting wasted food and other organic waste from landfill to composting, methane emissions are significantly reduced and carbon is sequestered. Many composting operations have been established thanks to the Maine Compost School. A few recent Maine small businesses that were formed by compost school graduates and continue to grow include Scrapdogs Compost and Chickadee Compost. In addition, graduates have gone on to manage municipal organics recycling operations such Lamoille Soil in Vermont. The Maine Compost School's mission promotes innovation to make composting more efficient.

For more information on EPA's Environmental Merit Awards, including a video of today's award ceremony, visit: EPA New England Environmental Merit Awards

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