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EPA Announces $3.65 Million Grant to Rural Community Assistance Partnership to Reduce Lead in Drinking Water

EPA Air - Fri, 10/21/2022 - 19:00

LENEXA, KAN. (OCT. 21, 2022) – The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) announced the projects selected to receive over $30 million in grant funding under the Water Infrastructure Improvements for the Nation (WIIN) Act, including $3.65 million to the Rural Community Assistance Partnership (RCAP). This grant funding, and additional funding through the Bipartisan Infrastructure Law, will help make rapid progress on the goal of addressing lead and removing lead pipes across the country.

“A pillar of our work at EPA is ensuring that every person in every community has safe drinking water,” said EPA Assistant Administrator for Water Radhika Fox. “The science on lead is settled – there is no safe level of exposure. This grant funding will help reduce exposure to lead in drinking water and should be used to support underserved communities that are most at risk for exposure.”

“Region 7 is a rural region and this grant to the Rural Community Assistance Partnership is an important way EPA is investing in reducing childhood lead exposure in Iowa, Kansas, Missouri and Nebraska,” said EPA Region 7 Administrator Meg McCollister.

“RCAP plays a key role in fostering the technical, managerial, and financial capacity for our nation’s small water systems,” said Olga Morales-Pate, CEO of RCAP. “We are pleased to lead and coordinate this project to help small water systems, rural schools, and child care centers overcome systemic lead-related challenges, and we thank EPA for investing in our rural infrastructure and communities.”

Other selected projects are:

National Priority Area 1 – Reduction of Lead Exposure in the Nation’s Drinking Water Systems through Infrastructure and Treatment Improvements

  • City of Trenton, New Jersey - $5,530,000
  • City of Fall River, Maine - $10,000,000
  • Detroit, Michigan, Water and Sewerage Dept. - $5,000,000

National Priority Area 2 – Reduction of Children’s Exposure to Lead in Drinking Water in Schools and Child Care Facilities

  • Hawaii Dept. of Health - $2,000,000
  • School District of Philadelphia - $4,999,658

These selected projects will assist disadvantaged communities and schools with removing sources of lead in drinking water. These projects will work to further the goals of the Biden-Harris administration’s Lead Pipe and Paint Action Plan, in addition to the Justice40 Initiative, which seeks to deliver 40% of benefits from certain federal investments to disadvantaged communities in need.

Learn more about this grant and EPA’s WIIN grant programs.

Background

Lead poses serious health risks to both children and adults – children are especially vulnerable. Low-income and other historically underserved communities typically experience high levels of lead in their drinking water because they are disproportionately served by lead service lines. The six new projects selected across the country will receive grant funding under the WIIN Act through the Reducing Lead in Drinking Water grant program.

To date, over 2,400 lead service line replacements have been completed as a result of support from that grant program.

In addition to this announcement of funding availability, the Reducing Lead in Drinking Water WIIN grant program also awarded over $1 million in grant awards toward tribal lead reduction projects coordinated through interagency agreements between Indian Health Services and EPA. Additionally, EPA is working with states, tribes, and territories to award additional grant funding through EPA’s two other drinking water grant programs established by WIIN – the Voluntary Lead Testing in Schools and Child Care grant program and the Small, Underserved and Disadvantaged Communities (SUDC) Grant.

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Biden-Harris Administration Seeks Public Input on Inflation Reduction Act’s Greenhouse Gas Reduction Fund

EPA Air - Fri, 10/21/2022 - 19:00

WASHINGTON — Today, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) announced a coordinated stakeholder engagement strategy to help shape the implementation of the first-of-its-kind Greenhouse Gas Reduction Fund created by President Biden’s Inflation Reduction Act. EPA’s engagement strategy includes:

  • Expert Input: Soliciting expert input on key program design questions from the Environmental Financial Advisory Board (EFAB);
  • Request for Information: Issuing a public Request for Information to enable communities and the public to comment on the Fund’s design and implementation;
  • National Listening Session Series: Launching a stakeholder listening session series to enable key stakeholders including green banks, community finance institutions, environmental justice communities, state and local governments, clean energy advocates, labor, and others to provide input directly to EPA staff on the implementation of the Fund; and
  • New Webpage: Creating a website as a one-stop shop for information on the implementation of the Greenhouse Gas Reduction Fund.

These initial engagements will help ensure the Fund’s design and implementation reflect input from a variety of diverse stakeholders to ensure the full economic and environmental benefits of this historic investment are realized by all people, particularly those who have been most burdened by environmental, social, and economic injustice.

"The Greenhouse Gas Reduction Fund is an unprecedented opportunity to accelerate the adoption of greenhouse gas reducing technologies and position the United States to compete and win the 21st century economy,” said EPA Administrator Michael S. Regan. “In designing such an ambitious program, EPA is eager to hear from stakeholders across the country, especially in low-income and disadvantaged communities, whose voices are critical to shaping the Fund and ensuring these historic resources reach people who need them most. Coupled with the additional resources from President Biden’s Inflation Reduction Act, the Fund will deliver environmental and economic benefits across the country.”

The historic Inflation Reduction Act represents the most aggressive action to confront the climate crisis in our nation’s history. The Inflation Reduction Act established the Greenhouse Gas Reduction Fund – a $27 billion fund that will provide competitive grants to states, local governments, tribes and eligible non-profit financing institutions to mobilize financing and leverage private capital for clean energy and climate projects that reduce greenhouse gas emissions, with an emphasis on projects that benefit low-income and disadvantaged communities – and help advance the Biden-Harris Administration’s commitment to environmental justice. EPA will seek input on the types of entities, projects and financial structures that will best achieve the program objectives. 

Soliciting Expert Input from the Environmental Finance Advisory Board (EFAB)

EPA delivered a set of formal charge questions for expert review and comment at the October 18-19th meeting of the Environmental Finance Advisory Board (EFAB). EFAB is a Federal Advisory Committee that provides advice and recommendations to EPA's Administrator and regional and program offices on ways to lower the costs of, and increase investments in, environmental and public health protection. The EFAB includes a number of experts on clean energy and climate finance, including leaders of green banks and community financial institutions; state and local government officials; business and industry representatives; and members of environmental, tribes and non-governmental organizations, among others. The EFAB will provide its advice and recommendation on the charge questions by December 15, 2022.

Issuing a Request for Information

This week EPA published a Request for Information (RFI) seeking public comment on core design aspects of the Greenhouse Gas Reduction Fund. The notice has been published on EPA’s website and on Regulations.gov. The public will have 45 days to respond to the RFI.

Launching a National Listening Session Series

In the coming weeks, EPA will commence a series of listening sessions to allow members of the public and key stakeholder groups to provide insights to EPA staff on the implementation of the Greenhouse Gas Reduction Fund.

The series will begin with two public sessions in November. In addition, beyond engaging with the EFAB, EPA will meet with other expert advisory committees, including the Local Government Advisory Committee, the White House Environmental Justice Advisory Council, the National Environmental Justice Advisory Council, and other stakeholders to solicit input on the design of the Fund.

Listening Session 1: Nov. 1 from 7:00-9:00pm ET

Listening Session 2: Nov. 9 from 7:00-9:00pm ET

Background

The Inflation Reduction Act of 2022 amended the Clean Air Act to create a new program, the Greenhouse Gas Reduction Fund, which will deploy $27 billion in competitive grants to mobilize financing for clean energy and climate projects that reduce or avoid greenhouse gas emissions, especially in disadvantaged communities.  The Greenhouse Gas Reduction Fund includes: 

  • $7 billion for competitive grants to enable low-income and disadvantaged communities to deploy or benefit from zero-emission technologies, including distributed technologies on residential rooftops;
  • nearly $12 billion for competitive grants to eligible entities to provide financial and technical assistance to projects that reduce or avoid greenhouse gas emissions; and
  • $8 billion for competitive grants to eligible entities to provide financial and technical assistance to projects that reduce or avoid greenhouse gas emissions in low-income and disadvantaged communities. 

EPA to Hold Open Houses and Community Meetings for New Tazewell Residents about Health Risks from Ethylene Oxide

EPA Air - Thu, 10/20/2022 - 19:00

NEW TAZEWELL, Tenn. (October 20, 2022) - On Tuesday, October 25, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) will host several public forums at the Walters State Community College, 1325 Claiborne St., New Tazewell, Tenn. to share information about ethylene oxide (EtO) emissions and risk information impacting the city.

EPA is reaching out to communities facing the highest risks from commercial sterilizer facilities that use EtO, including the DeRoyal Industries facility located at 1135 Highway 33, South New Tazewell, Tenn. 

EPA is sharing this information because communities have a right to know about emissions that could affect their health and well-being. EPA will host two open houses and two community meetings. The open houses are in-person events; however, residents may participate in the community meetings in-person or virtually – either by phone or online on the Zoom platform.

Open House: 10 a.m. to 11 a.m.

* In-person only

Community Meeting: 11:15 am - 12:45 pm

In person: Walters State Community College, located at 1325 Claiborne St. in New Tazewell

By phone: Call in number: (669) 216-1590; Webinar ID: 1615247813

Register to join the community meeting virtually: https://usepa.zoomgov.com/webinar/register/WN_Brtqq3vHSwe87mAHxclimg

Open House: 6 p.m. - 7 p.m.

* In-person only

Community Meeting: 7:15 pm - 8:45 pm

In person: Walters State Community College, located at 1325 Claiborne St. in New Tazewell

By phone: Call in number: (833) 435-1820; Webinar ID: 1612906416

Register to join the community meeting virtually: https://usepa.zoomgov.com/webinar/register/WN_pSuQZND7SpauaOvhXz0xyw 

EtO is a colorless, odorless gas that is often used for sterilization purposes. Inhalation of EtO at elevated levels over a lifetime can increase a person’s risk of getting cancer. However, single-day exposures to the concentrations found in residential communities are not an immediate threat to an individual’s health.  

EPA scientists and analysts recently completed a risk assessment to understand the impact of EtO emissions from the DeRoyal Industries facility. As part of this risk assessment, we used the most recent available information about how much EtO the company emits into the air and we modeled estimated cancer risks to people living nearby. The risk assessment identified elevated cancer risk in the New Tazewell community. EPA is committed to working with state and local agencies, facilities, and communities to reduce this risk.

BACKGROUND

EPA has regulated EtO emissions for 30 years, however in 2016, new scientific information revealed that EtO is more toxic than previously understood. This prompted EPA to conduct nationwide analyses and intensive data collection, which has revealed that certain communities near commercial sterilizers could have elevated cancer risks due to lifetime exposures to EtO. Please visit www.epa.gov/eto for additional information, including a link to view EPA’s August 10th National Public Webinar, location-specific maps, information about individual commercial sterilizers, and health risks for residents and workers. 

For more information about EtO in New Tazwell, please visit: www.epa.gov/eto/new-tazewell.

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EPA protects Big Island water resources by ordering closure of three illegal cesspools

EPA Air - Thu, 10/20/2022 - 19:00

HONOLULU – The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has taken an enforcement action to close two illegal large capacity cesspools (LCCs) at the Wailuku Professional Plaza in Hilo and one cesspool at the SKS Management LLC self-storage business in Kailua-Kona. Under the Safe Drinking Water Act, EPA banned LCCs in 2005.

“Big Island companies must do their part to protect our surface water and groundwater resources from the disease-causing pollution found in large capacity cesspools,” said EPA Pacific Southwest Regional Administrator Martha Guzman. “EPA is committed to finding and closing all remaining illegal cesspools in Hawai‘i.”

The Wailuku Professional Plaza is located about 100 feet from the Wailuku River in Hilo. In July 2021, EPA conducted an inspection of the Plaza and found two unlawful cesspools serving the multi-tenant commercial office building. Wailuku Professional Plaza, LLC – which owns and operates the Wailuku Professional Plaza – settled the case, agreeing to close the illegal cesspools and pay a $43,000 penalty on May 4, 2022.

EPA also found that the Power Self Storage – Kuakini facility in Kailua-Kona has a restroom that is served by a large capacity cesspool. SKS Management LLC – the facility’s operator – settled the case, agreeing to pay a $28,780 penalty and close the illegal cesspool by September 1, 2023.

These cesspools meet the regulatory criteria of unlawful non-residential large capacity cesspools because they have the capacity to serve 20 or more persons per day. EPA is authorized to issue compliance orders and/or assess penalties to violators of the Safe Drinking Water Act’s cesspool regulations.

Cesspools collect and release untreated raw sewage into the ground, where disease-causing pathogens and harmful chemicals can contaminate groundwater, streams, and the ocean.

Since the 2005 federal ban, more than 3,750 large capacity cesspools in Hawaii have been closed; however, hundreds remain in operation. Cesspools are used more widely in Hawaii than any other state and pose a unique challenge as groundwater provides 95% of all water supply for the islands.

To encourage regulated entities to voluntarily discover, promptly disclose, and expeditiously close these pollution-causing systems, EPA provides penalty mitigation and other incentives for companies that proactively find and close LCCs on their property.

Information on how to self-disclose potential large-capacity cesspool violations is available at: https://www.epa.gov/compliance/epas-edisclosure.

For more information on the federal ban and definition of a large-capacity cesspool, please visit: https://www.epa.gov/uic/large-capacity-cesspools.

For more information on cesspools in Hawai’i, please visit: https://www.epa.gov/uic/cesspools-hawaii.

Learn more about EPA’s Pacific Southwest Region. Connect with us on Facebook and on Twitter.

EPA To Host Public Discussion of Exide Cleanup October 25

EPA Air - Thu, 10/20/2022 - 19:00

PHILADELPHIA (Oct. 20, 2022) --The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) will hold a public availability session on Tuesday, October 25, from 6:30 – 8:30 p.m. at the Muhlenberg High School Auditorium, 400 Sharp Ave. in Reading, Pennsylvania. Residents will have a chance  to learn about past, current, and future cleanup efforts at the former Exide Technologies Site located at 3000 Montrose Ave, in Laureldale.

The public will have a chance to meet one-on-one with the EPA Exide site team who will be sharing maps and various site information.  EPA will also hold a formal presentation followed by a question  and answer session about the site.

The former Exide Technologies Site consists of an approximately 40-acre former lead battery recycling and manufacturing facility. Under its Superfund Removal Program, EPA has removed significant lead contamination from the on-site baghouses and associated ductwork. Lead contamination is also being removed from the former process equipment, and containers are being cleaned as a protective measure.

To learn more about EPA’s removal program, visit: www.epa.gov/emergency-response/ epas-role-emergency-response

EPA Settlement Holds Tanker Truck Company Accountable for Two 2021 Oil Spills in Athol and Revere, Mass.

EPA Air - Thu, 10/20/2022 - 19:00

BOSTON – The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has reached a settlement with Goguen Transportation, Inc. of Gardner, Mass., resolving alleged violations of the Clean Water Act associated with two tanker truck accidents in Revere and Athol, Mass. that resulted in oil discharges to local waters.

"EPA takes our role of protecting public health and our environmental resources very seriously, with a special emphasis on communities that have been historically burdened with high levels of pollution," said EPA New England Regional Administrator David W. Cash. "Carefully following safety measures to prevent oil spills from occurring is Job One for companies that handle, store and transport oil, and Goguen Transportation failed to take the necessary care."

On two separate occasions, fuel oil was spilled from tanker trucks owned and operated by Goguen Transportation, polluting local waters and violating the Clean Water Act. On October 13, 2021, a Goguen oil tank trailer truck rolled over while navigating a traffic circle in Revere, releasing between 3,000 to 5,000 gallons of fuel oil into areas including Rumney Marsh, Diamond Creek and the Pines River. A second incident occurred on December 22, 2021, when a Goguen oil tank trailer truck rolled over at an intersection in Athol, releasing approximately 4,500 gallons of fuel oil into waters including Mill Brook and Millers River. On both occasions, the released fuel oil created a sheen and accumulated on the shoreline of impacted waters.

The Revere spill occurred in an area (Brown Circle Rotary) where residents have been historically overburdened with environmental concerns, including proximity to traffic and industrial facilities. Rumney Marsh encompasses approximately 2,274 acres and is an important coastal estuary that is home to a variety of wildlife. EPA's coordination with Commonwealth of Massachusetts officials showed that waterfowl were also negatively affected by the Revere spill, and the spill delayed the opening of the clam flat. Rumney Marsh is a 600-acre salt marsh located within the Saugus and Pines River Inlet. The Marsh is designated as an "Area of Critical Environmental Concern" under the Commonwealth and supports numerous activities to the public including canoeing and kayaking, fishing and clam harvesting, hiking and bird watching.

The company will pay a $35,354 penalty. EPA estimates that the company has spent over $570,000 to clean up the Revere spill, and that remediation for the Athol spill will be no less than $300,000 based on the distance oil traveled and amount of oil spilled.
More information: EPA Oil Spill enforcement

EPA to Hold Open Houses and Community Meetings for New Tazwell Residents about Health Risks from Ethylene Oxide

EPA Air - Thu, 10/20/2022 - 19:00

NEW TAZWELL, Tenn. (October 20, 2022) - On Tuesday, October 25, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) will host several public forums at the Walters State Community College, 1325 Claiborne St., New Tazewell, Tenn. to share information about ethylene oxide (EtO) emissions and risk information impacting the city.

EPA is reaching out to communities facing the highest risks from commercial sterilizer facilities that use EtO, including the DeRoyal Industries facility located at 1135 Highway 33, South New Tazewell, Tenn. 

EPA is sharing this information because communities have a right to know about emissions that could affect their health and well-being. EPA will host two open houses and two community meetings. The open houses are in-person events; however, residents may participate in the community meetings in-person or virtually – either by phone or online on the Zoom platform.

Open House: 10 a.m. to 11 a.m.

* In-person only

Community Meeting: 11:15 am - 12:45 pm

In person: Walters State Community College, located at 1325 Claiborne St. in New Tazewell

By phone: Call in number: (669) 216-1590; Webinar ID: 1615247813

Register to join the community meeting virtually: https://usepa.zoomgov.com/webinar/register/WN_Brtqq3vHSwe87mAHxclimg

Open House: 6 p.m. - 7 p.m.

* In-person only

Community Meeting: 7:15 pm - 8:45 pm

In person: Walters State Community College, located at 1325 Claiborne St. in New Tazewell

By phone: Call in number: (833) 435-1820; Webinar ID: 1612906416

Register to join the community meeting virtually: https://usepa.zoomgov.com/webinar/register/WN_pSuQZND7SpauaOvhXz0xyw 

EtO is a colorless, odorless gas that is often used for sterilization purposes. Inhalation of EtO at elevated levels over a lifetime can increase a person’s risk of getting cancer. However, single-day exposures to the concentrations found in residential communities are not an immediate threat to an individual’s health.  

EPA scientists and analysts recently completed a risk assessment to understand the impact of EtO emissions from the DeRoyal Industries facility. As part of this risk assessment, we used the most recent available information about how much EtO the company emits into the air and we modeled estimated cancer risks to people living nearby. The risk assessment identified elevated cancer risk in the New Tazewell community. EPA is committed to working with state and local agencies, facilities, and communities to reduce this risk.

BACKGROUND

EPA has regulated EtO emissions for 30 years, however in 2016, new scientific information revealed that EtO is more toxic than previously understood. This prompted EPA to conduct nationwide analyses and intensive data collection, which has revealed that certain communities near commercial sterilizers could have elevated cancer risks due to lifetime exposures to EtO. Please visit www.epa.gov/eto for additional information, including a link to view EPA’s August 10th National Public Webinar, location-specific maps, information about individual commercial sterilizers, and health risks for residents and workers. 

For more information about EtO in New Tazwell, please visit: www.epa.gov/eto/new-tazewell.

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EPA, EGLE to Continue Soil Cleanup at Velsicol Superfund Site in St. Louis, Michigan

EPA Air - Thu, 10/20/2022 - 19:00

Today, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the Michigan Department of Environment, Great Lakes, and Energy announced that a new phase of the cleanup will soon begin at the Velsicol Chemical Corp. Superfund site, in St. Louis, Michigan. Later this month, the agencies will start preparing to excavate approximately 100,000 tons of contaminated soil from the southern portion of the former Velsicol Chemical property.

Excavation will continue this year while weather permits and will resume in the spring. Workers will be onsite from 8 a.m. - 5 p.m., Monday through Saturday. All trucks will enter and leave the site through the gate located off State Route M-46 (Washington Ave). EPA anticipates that the cleanup will be done by fall 2023, and restoration work will be completed in 2024. All contaminated soil will be transported offsite for proper disposal.

The Velsicol plant operated from 1936 through 1977 and manufactured a wide variety of chemicals. Site spills and chemical discharges into the Pine River affected sediment, surface soils and groundwater.

For more information on the Velsicol Chemical Corp. site, please visit EPA’s website.

Biden Administration Continues Phasedown of Super-Pollutants to Combat Climate Change and Boost U.S. Manufacturing

EPA Air - Thu, 10/20/2022 - 19:00

WASHINGTON – Today, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) announced additional actions to phase down climate-damaging hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs), a crucial component of President Biden’s ambitious agenda to combat the climate crisis while advancing American manufacturing and innovation. EPA today issued a proposed rule to implement the next step of the nation’s HFC phasedown, an ambitious 40% reduction below historic levels starting in 2024. The proposal follows the Senate’s bipartisan approval to ratify the Kigali Amendment to the Montreal Protocol, a global agreement to phase down HFCs and avoid up to 0.5°C of global warming by the end of this century.

“From day one, President Biden promised ambitious action to address the climate crisis and its impacts, which are becoming ever more disruptive and costing billions of dollars every year. Today’s action once again delivers on his promise,” said EPA Administrator Michael S. Regan. “This proposal also sets the United States on track to meet the goals of the Kigali Amendment, fostering innovation and economic growth in the private sector and reinforcing U.S. leadership in the global fight against climate change.”

HFCs are a class of potent greenhouse gases commonly used in refrigeration and air conditioning, aerosols, and foam products. Their climate impact can be hundreds to thousands of times stronger than the same amount of carbon dioxide. Under the bipartisan American Innovation and Manufacturing (AIM) Act, the EPA has established a national HFC Phasedown Program that will reduce the production and consumption of these chemicals by 85% by 2036. The Biden-Harris Administration has also launched actions across other agencies to support this phasedown, which will create thousands of jobs to help ensure American companies outcompete the rest of the world in innovating and manufacturing HFC alternatives.

Today’s proposal establishes the methodology for allocating HFC production and consumption allowances for 2024 and later years, similar to the methodology used for issuing allowances in 2022 and 2023—an initial step to achieve 10% of this phasedown. Now, the number of available allowances in 2024 will be reduced significantly to 40% below historic levels. Today’s proposal would amend the historic consumption baseline level from which reductions are made to reflect corrected data submitted to EPA, as well as more precisely specify recordkeeping and reporting requirements, to help preserve the environmental and economic benefits associated with the HFC phasedown.

“Last month, we achieved a historic climate win in the Senate by coming together in a bipartisan manner to ratify the Kigali Amendment,” said Senate Environment and Public Works Committee Chairman Tom Carper (Del.). “I applaud the Biden Administration’s continued commitment to fully implementing the American Innovation and Manufacturing Act on schedule. Doing so keeps our nation on track to meet our HFC-reduction goals required under this global treaty, which is good for our planet and good for American businesses and workers.”

“I am proud to see the Biden Administration take this next step to implement the AIM Act. Phasing down HFCs is a critical component of our national climate action strategy, which is why Congress provided EPA with even more funding to administer this law under the Inflation Reduction Act,” said Congressman Paul Tonko (NY-20). “I hope EPA will move forward with a rule that further demonstrates that smart climate policies not only protect our environment, but also support U.S. consumers and manufacturers.”

"Super pollutants, like HFCs and methane, are the low-hanging fruit in the fight to slow climate change” said Congressman Scott Peters (CA-52). “Two years ago, Congress passed bipartisan legislation to phase down the production and consumption of HFCs by 85% by 2036. Today, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency will ensure we reduce these dangerous pollutants and protecting communities across the globe from climate change-fueled disasters.”

To ensure a level playing field for companies complying with the phasedown requirements, the HFC Phasedown Program has established robust enforcement mechanisms, drawing from experience globally with illegal HFC trade and with attempts to illegally introduce ozone-depleting substances into the U.S. market. Since January 1 of this year, companies have needed allowances for producing or importing HFCs. In the first nine months of this year, the Interagency Task Force on Illegal HFC Trade, co-led by EPA and the Department of Homeland Security, has prevented illegal HFC shipments equivalent to more than 889,000 metric tons of carbon dioxide (CO2) at the border, the same amount as the emissions from nearly 173,000 homes’ electricity use for one year.

Additionally, on September 30, EPA issued allowances to companies authorizing them to produce or import HFCs in 2023. EPA issued total allowances at the same level as in 2022 per the phasedown schedule, although the number of entities receiving allowances for 2023 increased slightly. EPA also notified certain companies that the Agency intends to retire some of their allowances due to misreporting data. The Agency’s administrative consequences authority, which allows EPA to retire, revoke, or withhold the allocation of allowances, or ban a company from receiving, transferring, or conferring allowances, is an important tool to deter illegal HFC production and import.

EPA is planning to issue additional proposed rules regarding HFCs under the AIM Act. The next proposed rule will focus on transitioning away from HFCs in the refrigeration and air conditioning, foams, and aerosols sectors. The refrigeration and air conditioning sector uses the most HFCs in the United States. 

Learn more about HFCs.

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